Making Harvard Modern: The Rise of America's University

By Morton Keller; Phyllis Keller | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In telling this tale we have relied heavily on the generosity of both friends and strangers. We are especially grateful for the research support of the Spencer Foundation. Without the act of faith of that exemplary institution, our book could not have been written. We owe a large debt as well to Brandeis University for its support. And we offer special thanks, too, to the Harvard Corporation for making archival materials available to us, as well as to the Rockefeller Foundation for a term as Resident Scholars at its Bellagio Center.

The staff of the Harvard Archives—in particular, University Archivist Harley Holden and Reference Archivist Brian Sullivan—were endlessly helpful. So, too, were our research assistants, Michael Fein and Darra Mulderry, whose intelligent assiduity made it possible for us to absorb the contents of 1,000 manuscript boxes. Jacob Gertzog and Greg Renoff did a fine job of checking footnotes, and Mr. Gertzog ably helped us to gather the book's illustrations.

We greatly benefited from the knowledge of Bernard Bailyn and Stephan Thernstrom of the Harvard History department, and longtime Daedalus editor Stephen Graubard, who took time out from busy careers to read our manuscript in its entirety and give us their detailed and insightful reactions. We owe much as well to the good judgment of our Oxford editor, Peter Ginna, and our agent, John Wright.

Scores of people, both in and out of Harvard, responded candidly to our interviews and questions, and/or read parts of our text or helped us in other ways. These coadjutors greatly enhanced our understanding of the complex institution that is the subject of this book. If errors of fact and understanding remain in our account (and we have little doubt that they do), that is our doing (or not-doing), not theirs. We thank them all:

Daniel Aaron, James Adelstein, Walter Jackson Bate, Fran Beane, Sam Beer, Daniel Bell, Ann Berman, Elkan Blout, John Blum, Derek Bok,

-565-

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Making Harvard Modern: The Rise of America's University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue - Fete Accompli, 1936 3
  • Part I - The Meritocratic University 1933–1953 11
  • 1 - James Bryant Conant and the Meritocratic University 13
  • 2 - The College 32
  • 3 - “lesser Breeds” 47
  • 4 - The Faculty of Arts and Sciences 64
  • 5 - The Professional Schools 110
  • 6 - Managing Harvard 134
  • 7 - Harvard and the Real World 152
  • Part II - “an Engine of Power and Responsibility”: 1953–1971 171
  • 8 - Nathan Marsh Pusey and the Affluent University 173
  • 9 - Governing the Affluent University 189
  • 10 - The Ascendant Faculty 211
  • 11 - The Professional Schools 252
  • 12 - A Plurality of Minorities 276
  • 13 - The College 290
  • 14 - Crisis and Recovery 307
  • Part III - “a Buzzing Confusion”:1971–2000 339
  • 15 - Derek Curtis Bok and the Worldly University 341
  • 16 - Governing 359
  • 17 - The Faculty of Arts and Sciences 383
  • 18 - The Professional Schools 432
  • 19 - The College 464
  • Epilogue 481
  • A Note on the Notes 495
  • Notes 499
  • Acknowledgments 565
  • Index 567
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