Crossing Over: Teaching Meaning-Centered Secondary English Language Arts

By Harold M. Foster | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
ACT English Aptitude Test, 35
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The, 159–162
Advice, classroom discipline, 295–296
African-American directors, 239, see also Film
African-American literature, 74
AIDS, 39
Almos' a Man, 305
America, 1950s–1960s, 26–27, 29–30,
Analysis
class and critiquing the rough draft, 200–204
Great Gatsby, The, 152
media, 253–255
teaching television, 253, 254, 258
Analytic scoring, 343–344
April 27th, 134, see also Poetry
Arguments, 243, 244, see also Breakfast Club, The
Asian-American literature, 74–75
Assignments, 104–105, 303, 326
Audience, 185, 341–342

B
Backlash, 9
Behaviorist movement, 6, 8
Benchmarks, 47, 349, see also IRA/NeCTE standards
Black English, 218–219
Books, discussion, see also Reading; Reading workshops
IRA/NeCTE standards, 95–96
lesson, 88–92
introducing, 86–88
reading in rural classroom, 54, 57
reader-response theory, 14
reflections, 92–94
school, students, and teacher, 85
teacher as researcher, 94–95
young adult, 15
Boyz in the Hood, 239
Breakfast Club, The
teaching, 240–246
obtaining permission, 236–237
World Wide Web, 252
Bridge to Terabithia, 56, 67
Bulletin boards, 185

C
Casting, 106, 260–261, 327, see also Drama
Catcher in the Rye, 31
Censorship, 57–59
Characters
Great Gatsby, The152–154
Midsummer's Night Dream, A, 106
To Kill a Mockingbird, 168, 332–333
Child readers, 15
Children's commercials, 256–257, see also Television
Chinese, 222–223
Clarity, writing, 215–217
Classics, 16–17, 28
Classroom
confrontations, 296
as courtroom, 241–246
environment and teaching students, 41
reading lesson, 59–66
veteran teacher, 294–295
World Wide Web, 249–252
writing, 179–180, 181
Collective emotion, 32
Comfort zone, 36
Commercials, 255–257, see also Television
Communication, global, 36
Community language, 218
Comprehension, reading, 338
Computers
grading and assessment, 272–275
learning by adults, 38
writing workshop, 223–225
Concrete poems, 138–139, see also Poetry
Conference record, 272

-365-

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