Cognitive Social Psychology: The Princeton Symposium on the Legacy and Future of Social Cognition

By Gordon B. Moskowitz | Go to book overview

neutral priming condition. Although it seems important to determine whether individual differences (level of sexism, discrepancy proneness) moderates these effects, clearly participants were not hesitant to apply activated stereotypes to relevant targets, and they only applied the stereotypes in relation to relevant targets.

As Fiske and Stevens (1993) pointed out, gender stereotypes may be fundamentally different than stereotypes related to race, age, or disability. First, gender stereotypes are strongly prescriptive; they inform women and men of what they should be like, rather than simply being descriptive stereotypes. Second, norms against the expression of sexism are not as strong as norms against the expression of other forms of prejudice. Third, many stereotypes about women are benevolent in nature, such as the idea that women should be helped and protected (Glick & Fiske, 1996). These factors, which are all related to the social context in which stereotypes are developed and maintained, may contribute to a general disinclination to attempt to self-regulate one's sexist responses.


CONCLUSIONS

Our review of relevant literature led us to conclude that there are many reasons, stemming from social cognitive factors alone, that stereotypes are likely to be used as a basis for responding to members of stereotyped groups. Our review also suggested that individuals can use many strategies for controlling prejudiced responses, but that these strategies have important boundary conditions related to perceivers having sufficient motivation, awareness, and cognitive resources to implement the strategies. Nevertheless, we are optimistic about the potential for control over prejudiced responses because we believe there is sufficient theoretical reason and empirical support to expect that stereotyping is a process that can be deautomatized. Future research may reveal just how much control is possible, and we identified a variety of issues that we believe should be considered as this research unfolds.

Although our position is that the processes involved in automatic stereotyping effects can be controlled and changed, we wish to underscore a distinction between what people can do and what they ultimately will do. Exerting control over prejudiced responses is no easy task. Even the most highly motivated individuals will no doubt experience frustrations and difficulties of a variety of forms. Thus, an important future challenge for researchers examining issues of control in stereotyping is to understand not only how people can exert control over prejudiced responses, but also how they can be encouraged to persist in their efforts to do so.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Preparation of this chapter was supported in part by Grant 1R29MH56536 from the National Institute of Mental Health to Margo Monteith.

-387-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognitive Social Psychology: The Princeton Symposium on the Legacy and Future of Social Cognition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 503

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.