Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture: Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

By Benjamin L. Alpers | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am deeply indebted to the many people who have helped this project reach completion: to Daniel Rodgers, my graduate adviser, and the rest of my doctoral committee, Richard Challener, Arno Mayer, and Alan Brinkley; to Gary Gerstle, without whom I would never have become a twentieth- century historian; to Joan Rubin, Bill Jordan, Tony Grafton, and Karen Merrill, who each taught me much about what it means to be a historian and a scholar; to Phil Katz, Kevin Downing, Darryl Peterkin, John Earle, Leslie Tuttle, and many other fellow graduate students whose intellect, wit, and fellowship will always be with me; to Jennifer Delton, Andrew Cohen, and ebecca Plante, with whom I shared many ideas and hope to continue to do so; to David Nord and my other editors and readers at the Journal of American History, in which Chapter 6 appeared in slightly different form; to Don B. Morlan and Abbott Gleason for bibliographic insights; to Randy Lewis, who, in the final stages of this project, has been an indispensable reader and an even better friend.

Thanks must also go to the many librarians and archivists who have made my research possible: Rosemary Hanes and the other librarians at the Motion Picture Section of the Library of Congress; the staff of the National Archives' Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch; Robert Denham of the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Indiana; Elizabeth Carroll- Horrocks of the American Philosophical Society Library; the librarians at Houghton Library at Harvard University; the wonderful staff of Princeton's Firestone Library; and the many librarians at the Universities of Missouri and Oklahoma.

I am grateful for the material generosity of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation (which, through the Mellon Fellowships in the Humanities, the Princeton Wilson Fellows, and Princeton's Mellon post- enrollment dissertation fellowships, funded my work for four and one-half academic years and two summers), the Eisenhower World Affairs Institute, and Princeton University.

I wish to thank all of those who have made the University of Oklahoma's Honors College such an extraordinary place in which to work: to Steve Gillon for laying the groundwork for a wonderful scholarly environment and to

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