Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture: Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

By Benjamin L. Alpers | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

PRIMARY SOURCES

Archives and Museums
Cambridge, Mass.
Houghton Library, Harvard University, Robert Sherwood Papers
College Park, Md.
National Archives
Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch
Los Angeles, Calif.
Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Philadelphia, Pa.
American Philosophical Society Library
South Bend, Ind.
Studebaker National Museum
Washington, D. C.
Library of Congress
Motion Picture Section

Books and Pamphlets

Agee, James. Agee on Film. Drawings by Toni Ungerer. Vol. 1. 1958. Reprint, New York: Grossett and Dunlap, 1972.

Americana Institute. Isms. New York: Americana Institute, 1939.

Arendt, Hannah. The Origins of Totalitarianism. 1st ed. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1951.

———. The Origins of Totalitarianism. New Edition with Added Prefaces. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973.

Armstrong, Hamilton Fish. "We or They": Two Worlds in Conflict. New York: Macmillan, 1937.

Army Life. War Department Pamphlet 21-13. Washington, D. C.: GPO, 1944.

Arnold, Thurman Wesley. The Folklore of Capitalism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1937.

Baker, Newton Diehl, Carlton J. H. Hayes, and Roger Williams Straus, ed. The American Way: A Study of Human Relations among Protestants, Catholics, and Jews. New York: Willett, Clark, 1936.

Benét, Stephen Vincent, with a foreword by Norman Rosten; decorated by Ernest Stock. We Stand United and Other Radio Scripts. New York: Farrar and inehart, 1945.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture: Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 405

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.