The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America

By Sarah Barringer Gordon | Go to book overview

NOTES
ABBREVIATIONS
AHR American Historical Review
AQ American Quarterly
CG Congressional Globe
CR Congressional Record
DC Doctrine and Covenants
JAH Journal of American History
JD Journal of Discourses
JMH Journal of Mormon History
"Mormon Monster" "The Mormon Monster" Lecture, delivered by Kate Field, in the Congregational Church, corner of 10th and G Streets, Washington, D. C., Wednesday evening, Dec. 15, 1886, reported by John Irvine, MS 3111, Historical Department, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City
UHQ Utah Historical Quarterly
YJLH Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities

INTRODUCTION
1.
Then as now, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) were popularly called Mormons. In the nineteenth century, the label "Mormon," drawn from the scripture the Book of Mormon, was frequently deployed as an insult and experienced as such by its targets. In the twentieth century, however, the name Mormon for most intents and purposes lost its derogatory connotation and is widely used by contemporary Mormon histo- rians to describe church members in the nineteenth century. See, for example, Leonard J. Arrington and David Bitton, The Mormon Experience: A History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints(New York, 1978). The professional historical association, moreover, is called the Mormon History Association, and its periodical, the Journal of Mormon History. This book follows the common practice and uses the term "Mormon" to describe LDS church members.

The traditional Mormon term for all non-Mormons is "Gentile." This term however, and is not widely accepted. It is not considered appropriate to describe, for example, Jews. This book, therefore, uses the term "non-Mormon" wherever possible.

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The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Mormon Question - Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction - Faith and the Contested Constitution *
  • Part One - The Laws of God and the Laws of Man *
  • Chapter 1 - The Power of the Word(S) *
  • Chapter 2 - The Twin Relic of Barbarism *
  • Chapter 3 - The Logic of Resistance *
  • Part Two - Days of Judgment *
  • Chapter 4 - Law and Patriarchy at the Supreme Court *
  • Chapter 5 - The Erosion of Sympathy *
  • Chapter 6 - The Marital Economy *
  • Epilogue - The (Un)Faithful Constitution *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Index *
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