The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America

By Sarah Barringer Gordon | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Without the opportunity to think and learn from insightful teachers, this intellectual history could not be written. Mary B. Corcoran, Donald Olson, and Elizabeth Clark gave me much support and joy. I miss them all. Margaret Farley and John Mullin at Yale Divinity School; Burke Marshall, Perry Dane, Barbara Black, and Robert Cover at Yale Law School; and David Brion Davis in the history department, all showed me the great moral power of the past. In the history department at Princeton, Daniel Rodgers has been an unflinching friend and rigorous mentor. His example has been one to admire and, when possible, to emulate. Stanley Katz is a true and wise counselor.

Outside Princeton, I received invaluable support from a year as a Golieb Fellow at the Legal History Colloquium at New York University Law School, as well as from a Charlotte Newcombe Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, a Littleton- Griswold Travel Grant from the American Historical Association, a Huntington Library Fellowship, a Rockefeller Fellowship at the Center for Human Values at Princeton University, a Pew Fellowship at the Center for the Study of American Religion at Yale University, and a Young Scholar in Ethics and Public Life Fellowship from Cornell University. Last but not least, the University of Pennsylvania Law School allowed me to start with a year's leave as I began the process of turning an unwieldy dissertation into a reasonably short book. Libraries and librarians have also been key to this project, including but not limited to Firestone Library at Princeton University and its curator of Western Americana, Alfred Bush; the Historical Department of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, especially Ronald Barney and William Slaughter; the Utah State Historical Society; Van Pelt and Biddle Law Libraries at the University of Pennsylvania, and reference librarians Catharine Krieps, Heidi Heller, and Edwin Greenlee; Marriott Library at the University of Utah; the Rocky Mountain West Division of the National Archives; the Library of Congress; Beinecke and Sterling Libraries at Yale University; Widener Library at Harvard University; the New York Public

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The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Mormon Question - Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction - Faith and the Contested Constitution *
  • Part One - The Laws of God and the Laws of Man *
  • Chapter 1 - The Power of the Word(S) *
  • Chapter 2 - The Twin Relic of Barbarism *
  • Chapter 3 - The Logic of Resistance *
  • Part Two - Days of Judgment *
  • Chapter 4 - Law and Patriarchy at the Supreme Court *
  • Chapter 5 - The Erosion of Sympathy *
  • Chapter 6 - The Marital Economy *
  • Epilogue - The (Un)Faithful Constitution *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Index *
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