The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000

By Hasia R. Diner | Go to book overview

5
A CENTURY OF JEWISH POLITICS
1820–1920

“With politics. ” Isaac Leeser declared in 1855 in his journal, Occident and American Jewish Advocate, “Jews have little concern, except to vote for those whom they individually may deem most fitting to administer the offices created for the public good. ” 1 Politically, during this formative century, Jews functioned as voters, officeholders, or as petitioners to government officials, and many, like Leeser, claimed that they did so as Americans—or Ohioans, Georgians, Californians, and New Yorkers—in the interest of the community as a whole. Yet the simplicity of Leeser's statement, articulated repeatedly by American Jews, belied a more complicated world of American Jewish politics. For during this era Jews in America founded a range of organizations to argue on their behalf and on behalf of Jewish people around the globe. These defense agencies reflected both the ways in which immigration shaped Jewish life and the lack of a clear boundary between American Jews and their sisters and brothers living elsewhere.

Leeser did offer a correct assessment in that American Jews in the century from the 1820s through the 1920s neither voted as a deliberate bloc nor took a unified stand on major political issues. Nothing demonstrated this fact better than the Civil War and the issue of slavery. Southern Jews regarded the matter no differently than did their neighbors. Three thousand Jewish men fought in gray uniforms, and Jewish women aided the cause with volunteer work. Northern Jews took a more complicated stance. Some ardently opposed the “peculiar institutio. ” of slavery, and a handful of Jews who were part of militantly abolitionist groups, like

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The S. Mark Taper Foundation Imprint in Jewish Studies *
  • Jewish Communities in the Modern World *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Earliest Jewish Communities 11
  • 1 - 1654–1776 13
  • 2 - 1776–1820 41
  • Part Two - The Pivotal Century 69
  • 3 - 1820–1924 71
  • 4 - 1820–1924 112
  • 5 - 1820–1920 155
  • Part Three - Twentieth-Century Journeys 203
  • 6 - 1924–1948 205
  • 7 - 1948–1967 259
  • 8 - 1967–2000 305
  • Notes 359
  • Bibliography 395
  • Index 409
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.