Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors

By Otha Richard Sullivan | Go to book overview

ANGELA D.
FERGUSON, M.D.
(B.1925)

Angela D. Ferguson was born in Washington, D.C., on February 15, 1925. She was one of eight children. Her father was a teacher at Samuel Armstrong School, a segregated school in Washington, D.C. As a child, Angela learned the importance of working and helping the family. Many African Americans were woefully underpaid and lived in poverty in the 1920s.

Although the Ferguson family suffered economically, they never considered themselves poor, believing that the greatest poverty was that of the spirit. Angela's parents taught her and her siblings at an early age to hold their heads high, respect others, become educated, and contribute to humankind. Her parents emphasized that education is the vehicle to a productive life and a buffer to discrimination and oppression.

Angela was a talented student in elementary school, always making the honor roll. She loved to read and her teachers frequently praised her. Angela always wanted to know more. In her classes, she was the first to raise her hand to answer or ask a question. Her teachers recognized that she was destined to become a leader.

-72-

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Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Early Years 5
  • Ellen F. Eglin (1849–?) 7
  • Sara E. Goode (1850–?) 13
  • Miriam E. Benjamin (–?) 18
  • Part Two - Into the New Century 23
  • Madame C.J. Walker (1867–1919) 25
  • Annie Turnbo Malone (1869–1957) 31
  • Roger Arliner Young, Ph.D. (1889–1964) 35
  • Marjorie Stewart Joyner, Ph.D. (1896–1994) 40
  • Part Three - Modern Times 45
  • Mildred Austin Smith (1916–1993) 47
  • Bessie Blount Griffin (1913–?) 51
  • Jane Cooke Wright, M.D.(B.1919) 56
  • Evelyn Boyd Granville, Ph.D.(B.1924) 62
  • Jewel Plummer Cobb, Ph.D.(B.1924) 68
  • Angela D. Ferguson, M.D.(B.1925) 72
  • Reatha Clark King, Ph.D.(B.1938) 77
  • Betty Wright Harris, Ph.D.(B.1940) 83
  • Patricia Bath, M.D.(B.1942) 88
  • Valerie Thomas (B.1943) 93
  • Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. (B.1946) 97
  • Alexa Canady, M.D.(B.1950) 102
  • Sharon J. Barnes (B.1955) 108
  • Mae Jemison, M.D. (B.1956) 112
  • Ursula Burns (B.1958) 117
  • Aprille Joy Ericsson Jackson, Ph.D. (B.1963) 121
  • Dannellia Gladden Green, Ph.D. (B.1966) 126
  • Chavonda J. Jacobs Young, Ph.D. (B.1967) 130
  • Chronology 135
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 143
  • Picture Credits 145
  • Index 147
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