Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors

By Otha Richard Sullivan | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Baker, Henry E. The Colored Inventor: A Record of Fifty Years. 1915. Reprint, New York: Arno Press, 1968.

Black Contributors to Science and Energy Technology. Washington, D.C.: Department of Energy, Office of Affairs, 1979.

Blashfield, Jean F. Women Inventors: Sybilla Masters, Mary Beatrice Davidson Kenner, and Mildred Austin Smith, Stephanie Kwolek, Frances Gabe. Capstone Press, 1996.

Brodie, James Michael. Created Equal: The Lives and Ideas of Black American Inventors. New York: William Morrow, 1993.

Carwell, Hattie. Blacks in Science: Astrophysicist to Zoologist. Smithtown, N.Y.: Exposition Press, 1977.

Haskins, James. Outward Dreams: Black Inventors and Their Inventions. New York: Bantam Books, 1991.

Hayden, Robert C. Eleven African American Doctors. New York: First Century Books, 1992.

Hill, Susan T. Blacks in Undergraduate Science and Engineering Education. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1992.

Ives, Patricia Carter. “Patent and Trademark Innovations of Black Americans and Women, ” Journal of the Patent Office Society 62, No. 2, 1980.

James, Portia P. The Real McCoy: African American Invention and Innovation, 1619–1930. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Press, 1989.

Massey, Walter E. “A Success Story Amid Decades of Disappointment.” Science 258: 1177–1179, November 13, 1992.

Matthews, Rose Christine. Underrepresented Minorities and Women in Science, Mathematics and Engineering: Problems and Issues for the 1990's. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 1990.

McDonald, Anne L. Women and Invention in America. New York: Ballantine Books, 1972.

McKissack, Patricia, and Fred McKissack. African American Inventors. Brookfield, Conn.: The Millbrook Press, 1994.

Piper, Edna Mary Aliyce, “Beyond the Next Veil: Black Women Inventors.” UCLA dissertation, University Research Library, 1989.

Salzman, Jack, David Lionel Smith, and Cornel West, eds. The Encyclopedia of African American Culture and History. New York: Macmillan, 1996.

Sammons, Vivian O. Blacks in Science and Medicine. New York: Hemisphere Pub. Corp., 1990.

Simmons, Barbara, ed. and Brian Lanker, photographer. I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America. New York: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1989.

Sluby, Patricia Carter. “Black Women and Inventors.” A Scholarly Journal of Black Women. 6 (2):34, Fall 1989.

Stone, Richard. “Industrial Efforts: Plenty of Jobs, Little Minority Support in Biotech.” Science 262:1127, November 12, 1993.

Sullivan, Otha Richard. African American Inventors. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.

White, Patricia E. Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering: An Update. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1992.

Williams, Larry De Van. “Educating Minority Children in an Environment That Makes Engineering an Attainable Goal.” IEEE Communications Magazine 28: 58–60, December 1990.

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Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Early Years 5
  • Ellen F. Eglin (1849–?) 7
  • Sara E. Goode (1850–?) 13
  • Miriam E. Benjamin (–?) 18
  • Part Two - Into the New Century 23
  • Madame C.J. Walker (1867–1919) 25
  • Annie Turnbo Malone (1869–1957) 31
  • Roger Arliner Young, Ph.D. (1889–1964) 35
  • Marjorie Stewart Joyner, Ph.D. (1896–1994) 40
  • Part Three - Modern Times 45
  • Mildred Austin Smith (1916–1993) 47
  • Bessie Blount Griffin (1913–?) 51
  • Jane Cooke Wright, M.D.(B.1919) 56
  • Evelyn Boyd Granville, Ph.D.(B.1924) 62
  • Jewel Plummer Cobb, Ph.D.(B.1924) 68
  • Angela D. Ferguson, M.D.(B.1925) 72
  • Reatha Clark King, Ph.D.(B.1938) 77
  • Betty Wright Harris, Ph.D.(B.1940) 83
  • Patricia Bath, M.D.(B.1942) 88
  • Valerie Thomas (B.1943) 93
  • Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. (B.1946) 97
  • Alexa Canady, M.D.(B.1950) 102
  • Sharon J. Barnes (B.1955) 108
  • Mae Jemison, M.D. (B.1956) 112
  • Ursula Burns (B.1958) 117
  • Aprille Joy Ericsson Jackson, Ph.D. (B.1963) 121
  • Dannellia Gladden Green, Ph.D. (B.1966) 126
  • Chavonda J. Jacobs Young, Ph.D. (B.1967) 130
  • Chronology 135
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 143
  • Picture Credits 145
  • Index 147
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