Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader

By Lawrence O. Gostin | Go to book overview

Conventions Used
in This Book

The excerpted materials in the Reader have been edited for clarity and reduced length. These edits have been made carefully so as not to compromise the meaning or substance of the readings. My intent is to communicate the substance of the case or article, in the words of the author(s), without interfering with its readability. The following editing and other conventions have been used consistently throughout the Reader.

The citation form for books and articles is taken from The Chicago Manual of Style (14th ed.). The citation form for judicial cases is taken from The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (17th ed.). All original references or notes in the excerpts have been deleted, except where they support quotations. In these instances, the references have been added to the bibliography and indicated within the text of the reading. Headings and subheadings within articles or cases have been capitalized and italicized, respectively, regardless of how they appear in the original text. Brackets ([ ]) are used in the readings to introduce my own commentary or edits of the original excerpted material.

Omissions of text within articles and cases are indicated through the use of ellipses (…) in accordance with the following rules: three periods (…) indicate an omission within a sentence and four periods (…) indicate an omission that includes a sentence break (and may consist of part of a paragraph or several paragraphs). Five asterisks within the

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