Buffalo Bill Cody: The Man behind the Legend

By Robert A. Carter | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
“Where Council Fires Gleamed”

William Frederick Cody, the legendary “Buffalo Bill, ” died quietly and painlessly at five minutes past noon on January 10, 1917, in the Denver home of his sister May Cody Decker. Cody had four sisters—Julia, Eliza, Laura Ella (known as Helen), and Mary Hannah (May)—and one half sister, Martha. At the time of his death, only Julia and May were still liv/ ing.

Within minutes the news was telegraphed around the world, having been given “Clear the Line” status by Western Union and the other tele/ graph companies, a status then reserved only for news of the war raging in Europe.

Joseph Bona of the Olinger Mortuary in Denver was called to the Decker home at 2932 Lafayette Street at about one o'clock. He em/ balmed the body in the bedroom where it lay. Bona said he found “a man of unusual appearance, tall and straight, with fine, big veins that made the embalming so easy he was finished in about two-and-one-half hours.” The young mortician later told how impressed he was by the telegrams and messages streaming in from all over the world: from the king of En/ gland, the kaiser of Germany, President Wilson, governors, generals, sen/ ators, friends from everywhere.

Indeed, for one day, William Frederick Cody stole center stage from a world war.

The accolades were indeed impressive. Said Lieutenant General Nel/ son A. Miles: “Colonel Cody was a high-minded gentleman, and a great scout. He performed a great work in the West for the pioneers and for the generations coming after them and his exploits will live forever in history.”

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Buffalo Bill Cody: The Man behind the Legend
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.