Making Modern Mothers: Ethics and Family Planning in Urban Greece

By Heather Paxson | Go to book overview

4
Maternal Citizens
Demographics, Pronatalism,
and Population Policy

The family, being the cornerstone of the preservation and the advancement of the Nation, as well as marriage, motherhood and childhood, shall be under the protection of the State.

Article 21, Constitution of the Republic of Greece, “In the name of the
Holy and Consubstantial and Indivisible Trinity”

During my time in Athens, I heard all sorts of people exclaim over the immediate certainty that “Greece is getting smaller. ” An elderly lady once lectured me sternly about “people these days not having children anymore” as she clutched my arm for support while darting through stalled traffic on Vasilissis Sofias Avenue. A surprising number of Athenians can quote the country's fertility index: 1.4 children per woman of reproductive age while I was in Greece (dropping to 1.28 by 1999; see Council of Europe 2001). Everyone has a theory. As noted earlier, popular explanation pins blame on the pollution-filled haze that hangs over the nation's capital, which, as a kind of symbol of the toxic side of modernity, is held responsible for declining sperm counts. In a radio commercial broadcast during record-breaking heat in the summer of 1999, one that played to the common perception that people are having sex less frequently these days, an air-conditioner manufacturer promoted its product as a solution to the country's “problem of underfertility” (Athanasiou 1999). What is more, nearly everyone I spoke with about it described ipoyenitikótita (underfertility) as a threat to the nation or to the Greek “race. ” Nadia said to me darkly, “There will not be a next generation…. And history will end. ” Soula commented, “A people will disappear if this rate continues. ” Although many laugh self-consciously even as they deliver the party line, Greece's demographic weakness, abbreviated simply as to dhimoghrafikó (the demographic), is a popular topic of conversation and concern.

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Modern Mothers: Ethics and Family Planning in Urban Greece
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.