Making Modern Mothers: Ethics and Family Planning in Urban Greece

By Heather Paxson | Go to book overview

5
Technologies of
Greek Motherhood

For women, the experience of motherhood passes through their bodies, whatever they do with motherhood. I mean, deciding against motherhood is just as hard as deciding for motherhood. But it's a decision you have to make. You cannot pass through your life and forget about it…. Motherhood you have to consider, in a positive or negative way.

KORALIA, forty-two-year-old professional

In After Nature (1992a), Marilyn Strathern contends that over the past few decades “the English” have been pressed into reconsidering their previously taken-for-granted views on how nature and culture relate to one another. Until recently, she argues, the English, and Euro-Americans more generally, have regarded the domain of Nature as a resource for the production of Culture and as a constraining model for human endeavor. 1 In regarding their cultural projects as both built on and imitating nature, modern Euro-Americans have taken “after nature. ” Today, however, when consumers gladly part with extra money to acquire specially grown organic produce, when researchers look to genetic therapy for cures for diseases, and when biodiversity must be politically claimed and secured by national and international agencies, nature no longer sits so obviously apart from cultural intervention: “Nature as a ground for the meaning of cultural practices can no longer be taken for granted if Nature itself is regarded as having to be protected and promoted” (Strathern 1992a, 177). What was once held implicit—that nature grounds culture—is being made explicit, with the result that people are widely coming to see nature as culturally constructed. Thus, not only are Euro-Americans “after” nature in acting with Nature in mind, they are today also postnature. Strathern does not find this surprising. This process of literalization, as she calls it, is fully in keeping with the Enlightenment proposition “that one should aim for a state of permanent revelation, to demystify and make things more and more apparent in consciously conveying it to others” (Strathern 1992a,

-212-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Modern Mothers: Ethics and Family Planning in Urban Greece
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.