Bringing the War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies

By Jeremy Varon | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
George Katsiaficas describes the New Left activism of the late 1960s as “world-historical” and suggests that it eclipsed the European uprisings of 1848– 49 in breadth and significance (Katsiaficas, The Imagination of the New Left: A Global Analysis of 1968 [Boston: Beacon Press, 1987], 3–13). Katsiaficas includes student and youth movements throughout the world under the rubric “New Left. ” I use the term only to describe those movements in the United States and western Europe, where youth protesters were commonly described as making up a “New Left. ” Moreover, I do not treat African-American radicals, who saw themselves as distinct from the overwhelmingly white student movement and counterculture, as part of the American New Left, though white and black activists certainly at times collaborated.
2
Though David Caute's Sixty-Eight: The Year of the Barricades (London: Hamish Hamilton, 1988) and Ronald Fraser's 1968: A Student Generation in Revolt (New York: Pantheon Books, 1988) adopt an international perspective, they provide mostly discrete portraits of the student movements in several countries and do little to articulate the connections between them. More genuinely comparative studies include Paul Berman, A Tale of Two Utopias: The Political Journey of the Generation of 1968 (New York: Norton, 2000); Karl-Werner Brand, ed., Neue soziale Bewegung in Westeuropa und den USA: Ein internationaler Vergleich (Frankfurt a. M.: Campus, 1985); Carole Fink, Philipp Gassert, and Detlef Junker, eds., 1968: The World Transformed (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998); Ingrid Gilcher-Holtey, ed., 1968: Vom Ereignis zum Gegenstand der Geschichtswissenschaft (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1998); and Arthur Marwick, The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, 1958–1974 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).

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