A River Running West: The Life of John Wesley Powell

By Donald Worster | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe heartfelt thanks to a long list of individuals who have helped make this book possible. High on that list stand my wife Bev, the world's most generous and cheerful companion, to whom this book is dedicated, and my students and colleagues at the University of Kansas who have enriched my social and intellectual life immeasurably. A special debt is owed to four exceptionally fine scholars, James Aton, Peter Mancall, Adam Rome, and Paul Salstrom, who read chapters of the manuscript-in-process and made many superb suggestions, and to those many lecture audiences that responded with penetrating questions and comments. Over the years my indispensable research assistants have included Karl Brooks, Jeffrey Crunk, Mark Frederick, Michael Grant, Mark Hersey, Nancy Scott Jackson, and Dale Nimz. Don Fowler, an eminent anthropologist and Powell scholar, and Clifford Nelson, historian at the U.S. Geological Survey, have been models of generosity and copious founts of information on many occasions. Others who have supplied valuable research assistance are Victor Bailey, Michael Brodhead, Sharon Clausen, Mark Davis, William de Buys, Robert Euler, Kevin Fernlund, Mary Ferguson, Ralph Frese, Gordon Holland, Donna Koepp, David Maas, Christian McMillan, Jim O'Brien, and William Steinbacher-Kemp. A number of research institutions and their staffs deserve particularly to be mentioned: the American Philosophical Society, the Brown University libraries, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints' Historical Department, the Denver Public Library's Western History Collection, the Huntington Library, the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution libraries, the Utah State Historical Society, the Wheaton College Library, and the libraries of the University of Arizona, the University of Kansas, and the University of Utah, along with others noted in the Bibliography. Not least, I have been blessed to have Gerard McCauley as my literary agent and Peter Ginna and Susan Day as my editors at Oxford.

-645-

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A River Running West: The Life of John Wesley Powell
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Prologue - Green River Station, 1869 ix
  • Part One - Northern Days 1
  • Chapter 1 - A Mission to America 3
  • Chapter 2 - Rising on the Prairie 37
  • Chapter 3 - The Hornets' Nest of War 85
  • Part Two - Canyons of the Colorado 107
  • Chapter 4 - Westward the Naturalist 109
  • Chapter 5 - Down the Great Unknown 155
  • Chapter 6 - Surveying the High Plateaus 203
  • Chapter 7 - Kapurats 261
  • Chapter 8 - The Sublimest Thing on Earth 297
  • Chapter 9 - Democracy Encounters the Desert 337
  • Part Three - Washington, D.C. 381
  • Chapter 10 - Myths and Maps 383
  • Chapter 11 - Redeeming the Earth 437
  • Chapter 12 - The Problem of the West 467
  • Chapter 13 - Journey's End 533
  • Notes 575
  • Bibliography 611
  • Acknowledgments 645
  • Index 647
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