The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937

By Shu-Mei Shih | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Evolutionism and Experimentalism
Lu xun and Tao Jingsun

Now survey China: Where are the warriors of the spirit? Is there a genuine voice to lead us to goodness, beauty and rigor? Is there a warm voice to deliver us from this barren winter?

LU XUN, “ON THE POWER OF MARA POETRY” (1908)

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe Like withered bodies to quicken a new birth! And, by the incantation of this verse, Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind! Be through my lips to unawakened earth The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind, If Winter comes, can spring be far behind?

P. B. SHELLEY, “ODE TO THE WEST WIND, ” AS QUOTED IN KURIYAGAWA HAKUSON's SYMBOLS OF MENTAL ANGUISH TRANSLATED INTO CHINESE BY LU XUN (1925)

It is better to admire Darwin and Ibsen rather than Confucius and Guan Yu; it is better to be sacrificed to Apollo rather than to the General of the Plague and the God of Five Spheres.

LU XUN, “ESSAY NUMBER 46” (1919) (“APOLLO” IN ENGLISH IN THE ORIGINAL)

When Lu Xun (1881–1936), the anointed “Father of Modern Chinese Literature, ” was eighteen years old, he reputedly read Yan Fu's translation of Thomas E. Huxley's Evolution and Ethics with great passion, to the point of committing the entire text to memory. This episode was recounted again and again in various essays he wrote later, and constituted one of the most memorable experiences of his student years at the Jiangnan Naval Academy during the waning years of the Qing dynasty (1898–1902). From the naval academy in

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 427

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.