The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937

By Shu-Mei Shih | Go to book overview

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abdel-Malek, A., ed. The Civilizational Project: The Visions of the Orient. Proceedings of the Thirtieth International Congress of Human Sciences in Asia and North Africa. Mexico City: El Colegio de México, 1981.

Abe Tomoji. “The New Poetic Schools in England and America” (Yingmei xinxing shipai). Translated by Gao Ming. Les Contemporaines (Xiandai) 2:4 (February 1933): 550–566.

Abe Tomoji. “Recollections” (Kaiso). Literary World (Bungakukai) 7 (September 1940): 180–184.

Akutagawa Ryunosuke. Travels in China (Shina yuki). English translation: see Joshua Fogel, trans. Chinese translation: see Mianzun [Xia Mianzun], pref. and trans.

Alitto, Guy. The Last Confucian: Liang Shu-ming and the Chinese Dilemma of Modernity. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.

All About Shanghai: A Standard Guidebook. Shanghai: University Press, 1934–1935. Reprint, Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Ames, Roger T. “Taoism and the Androgynous Ideal.” In Women in China, edited by Richard W. Guisso and Stanley Johannesen, 21–45. Youngstown, N.Y.: Philo Press, 1981.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. London: Verso, 1992.

Anderson, Marston. “The Morality of Form: Lu Xun and the Modern Chinese Short Stories.” In Lu Xun and His Legacy, edited by Leo Ou-fan Lee, 32–53. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985.

Anderson, Marston. The Limits of Realism: Chinese Fiction in the Revolutionary Period. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990.

Arac, Jonathan, and Harriet Ritvo, eds. Macropolitics of Nineteenth-Century Literature: Nationalism, Exoticism, Imperialism. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991.

Ardis, Ann. New Women, New Novels: Feminism and Early Modernism. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

-387-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 427

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.