The Market Revolution and Its Limits: A Price for Everything

By Alan Shipman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Few knew this book was on its way until I started borrowing their photocopiers and stopped returning their phone calls. But while they could never eradicate all the misinterpretations, most of those with whom I worked as student or understudy can claim credit for anything original in what follows. Pamela Palmer and Valerie Lynch provided an effective introduction to market economics, and tolerated some early swerves into possible alternatives. Dr Geoffrey Harcourt and Dr Peter Nolan helped me follow the mainstream back to its source, and showed how rival systems also flow from it. Terence Gorman and Dr David Hendry put up with my increasing confusion between the textbook market's American, Austrian and East Anglian accents. Dr Dieter Helm and two anonymous referees grappled with an MPhil thesis whose few serviceable ideas take a more useful role here. Professor Peter Hart and Professor David Mayes found some useful applications for research skills misleadingly claimed on this basis. Michael Ridge, then and after, was a much-valued source of ideas on economic life and the life of the economist.

The book took shape after I'd left market economics to test the market for economics. Barbara Beck provided a chance to meet some of those who made and moved markets, in the guise of a business journalist. Keith Craggs and Catherine Mayer dragged my prose style from working-paperese back to something approaching English. William Kemble-Diaz, whose Emerging Markets Monitor is always first to chart the market's advance (and retreat) in untraded terrain, put up with the increasing intrusion of half-formed theory into practical financial reporting. Dr Kevin Grice, Jonathan Feroze, Richard Londesborough, Mike Wright, Mike Russell, Bernard Kennedy, Rose Deverell, Kelly Beaconsfield and Robert Baptiste were among others at Business Monitor International who put up with erratic performance on the day-job as bigger ideas were being devised and discarded at night.

Final revisions to the text were made on a similarly nocturnal schedule during a regrettably brief tenure at the Economist Intelligence Unit. Particular thanks for sharing ideas and workloads there are owed to Laza Kekic, Simon Tilford, Kitty Ussher, Merli Baroudi, Joan Hoey, Peter Palmer, Fiona Mullen, Emily Morris, Adrienne Pratt, Annette Drepaul and Mary Curran. At Routledge, Alison Kirk obligingly accepted the case for a 'missing market' under this title and, with Andreja Zivkovic and Sally Carter, battled through various missed deadlines and

-vii-

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The Market Revolution and Its Limits: A Price for Everything
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction - The Market Revolution 1
  • 1 - What Markets Are 12
  • 2 - Markets as Efficient Allocators 37
  • 3 - Markets as the Route to Full Employment 91
  • 4 - Markets as Engines of Growth 122
  • 5 - Markets as Information Processors 166
  • 6 - Relational Transaction 196
  • 7 - Administered and Informed Transaction 239
  • 8 - Redesigning the Market 263
  • 9 - The International Market 312
  • 10 - The Distribution of Income 359
  • 11 - The State Goes on Sale 389
  • 12 - Its Limits 439
  • References 475
  • Index 489
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