The Engines of Our Ingenuity: An Engineer Looks at Technology and Culture

By John H. Lienhard | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1
1
The sequence leading to the invention of agriculture is described in: W. Stevens, “Dry Climate May Have Forced Invention of Agriculture, ” New York Times, April 2, 1991, section B. (based on work by Frank Hole and Joy McCorriston). Joseph Bronowski provides a cogent discussion of the mutations of grain-yielding grasses in The Ascent of Man (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1973), Chapter 2.
2
Here is a brief list of additional approximate human equivalents for units of measurement beyond those mentioned in the text. You will surely think of others as you scan this list.

inch: thumb digit foot: human foot yard or meter: distance from nose to tip of an outstretched arm quart: most liquid we could drink at one sitting decibel: least change in sound level we can hear BTU, kcal, or Joule: least energy we can sense in our coffee cup year, month, or day: time needed for natural experiences to recur month: menses second: order of magnitude of human reaction time mile per hour: speed of slow human locomotion

I treat the matter of dimensional similarity in my text, A Heat Transfer Textbook, 2nd ed. (Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1987), Chapter 4.

3
A good account of George Caley's work is given in: P. Scott, The Shoulders of Giants (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1995). See especially Chapters 2 and 3.
4
For the story of the Samurai sword and ceremony, see J. Bronowski, The Ascent of Man, Chapter 4, “The Hidden Structure.” This is also available on videotape and film. For more on Japanese swords see K. Sato, The Japanese Sword, trans. by Joe Earl (Tokyo: Kodansha International Ltd. and Shibundo, 1983).
5
W. Stevens, “The Man with the Blue Guitar, ” The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens (New York: Albert A. Knopf, 1982).
6
L. White Jr., Medieval Religion and Technology (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978), 105–120.
7
More on the streamlining movement can be found in an exhibit review: C. K.

-243-

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The Engines of Our Ingenuity: An Engineer Looks at Technology and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • The Engines of Our Ingenuity *
  • 1 - Mirrored by Our Machines 3
  • 2 - God, the Master Craftsman 20
  • 3 - Looking Inside the Inventive Mind 35
  • 4 - The Common Place 55
  • 5 - Science Marries into the Family 70
  • 6 - Industrial Revolution 86
  • 7 - Inventing America 96
  • 8 - Taking Flight 115
  • 9 - Attitudes and Technological Change 126
  • 10 - War and Other Ways to Kill People 139
  • 11 - Major Landmarks 153
  • 12 - Systems, Design, and Production 167
  • 13 - Heroic Materialism 179
  • 14 - Who Got There First? 193
  • 15 - Ever-Present Dangers 209
  • 16 - Technology and Literature 219
  • 17 - Being There 229
  • Correlation of the Text with the Radio Program 241
  • Notes 243
  • Index 255
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