Persuasive Imagery: A Consumer Response Perspective

By Linda M. Scott; Rajeev Batra | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
“Uncle Sam Wants You!”: Exploring
Verbal-Visual Juxtapositions
in Television Advertising
Amy A. Wiggin
Christine M. Miller
California State University, Sacramento

Excellent careers for excellent young men. (U.S. Army Recruiting brochure, 1952)

…we help ordinary young men and women become better. (http://www.goarmy.com, 2001)

Millions of tiny dots blend, creating a clear and distinct image. Bright colors flash across the screen, grabbing one's attention. Famous people lure in devoted viewers week after week. It is the phenomenon of television and it has become a dominating medium in the lives of many Americans. Television has come to serve as a source of information and entertainment, as an agenda setter, and as an aid in the socialization process (Gamble & Gamble, 1999; Vande Berg et al., 1998). Television also is used as a means to persuade viewers (Gamble & Gamble, 1999). The television industry is created and maintained by people whose primary goal is to make money (Vande Berg et al., 1998). Thus, advertisements function as a significant factor in television and are created as a means to persuade audience members to purchase or “buy into” a given product (Vande Berg et al., 1998).

Although many television commercials are aimed at selling a product, image, or service, some television commercials seek to recruit members to groups or organizations. Such advertisements have also been called “classified advertisements”and are aimed at recruiting new employees. The goal of both the product advertising television commercials and the recruitment television commercials is to persuade audience members to “buy into” what the advertisers are selling. The difference is that the recruitment television commercials are asking people to make

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