Interpersonal Communication Research: Advances through Meta-Analysis

By Mike Allen; Raymond W. Preiss et al. | Go to book overview

dividuals engage in when producing compliance-gaining appeals. Seven situational dimensions are identified that mediate the decision to endorse or suppress a potential persuasive appeal. Other meta-analyses in this section indirectly address interpersonal influence. In Ah Yun's (chap. 9) meta-analysis, the perception of attitudinal similarity is created, in part, through interpersonal influence attempts. Similarly, in Dindia's (chap. 10) meta-analysis on liking and self-disclosure, a partner might choose what to share to influence his or her relational partner's feelings of connectedness.


CONCLUSION

In this overview, we have tried to stress subtle distinctions between theories that share a great deal of intellectual space. Although recognizing the similarities, we believe that the dyadic nature of interpersonal communication can be illuminated by adopting the perspectives of relational and personal identity, attraction, relational uncertainty, disclosure patterns, social exchange, and interpersonal influence. Each theme highlights subtle features of relationships that lead to important outcomes. It is also fair to conclude that each theme emphasizes ongoing interpersonal processes that are fundamental to building, maintaining, or terminating relationships.

The goal of this preview was to offer a context for interpreting the meta-analyses in this section. Of course, each meta-analysis can stand alone as a summary of the domain of literature related to its topic. We believe that a longer view is also warranted. Meta-analytic findings have implications for the themes that have emerged over years, even decades, of research. The summaries in this section provide evidence that these dyadic communication themes are vital and robust. They summarize enduring issues, offer surprising insights, and pose interesting new questions for future investigation.

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