Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth

By Jefferson M. Fish | Go to book overview

Preface
Race and Intelligence: Separating Science From Myth is a comprehensive response to claims of differences in innate intelligence between the races. It differs in two important ways from other works on the topic, which tend to be limited to a discussion of IQ in the United States. First, this book discusses in great detail the concept of race, shows why it has no biological basis, explains the nature of human physical variation, and discusses the history and cross-cultural variability of conceptions of race. Second, in addition to discussing the United States in detail, it considers the measurement of intelligence and the use of IQ tests from a global perspective.Race and Intelligence shines the light of science on a number of widespread but false beliefs and presents a more accurate picture in their place. Taken together, these beliefs constitute a coherent but inaccurate ideology that has a long and unfortunate history; this work confronts the ideology in its most recent incarnation. Fortunately, what is known about the subject matter is fascinating and it forms a coherent alternative vision that can be presented in this single wide-ranging volume.The beliefs that this book responds to and that form a kind of syllogism, are the following:
1. Over time, Homo sapiens evolved into different subspecies or races—principally Mongoloids, Caucasoids, and Negroids.
2. In addition to biological differences in physical appearance, these races also manifest biologically based differences in behavior.
3. Human intelligence is an important form of behavior that can be measured by IQ tests. Intelligence is best understood as comprised of a single factor, g (general intelligence); and g has been shown to be largely (40%–80%) inherited.
4. There are racial differences in intelligence, with Mongoloids somewhat more intelligent than Caucasoids, and Caucasoids significantly more intelli-

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