Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth

By Jefferson M. Fish | Go to book overview

of human biological variability and intelligence. It is a long way from the assertion that the Caucasoid, Mongoloid, and Negroid races differ in innate intelligence to the rather different scientific conclusion that the human species has no races (although the United States and other cultures have a variety of folk concepts of race), that there is no single form of intelligence, and that formal education helps people to develop a number of cognitive abilities.” It is also an intellectual journey well worth taking.


REFERENCES

Baker, P. C., Keck, C. K., Mott, F. L., & Quinlan, S. V. (1993). NLSY child handbook (rev. ed.): A guide to the 1986–1990 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Child data. Columbus: Ohio State University.

Berry, J. W. (1969). On cross-cultural comparability. International Journal of Psychology, 4, 119–128.

Brace, C. L. (1998). Race and reason: The anthropological case for a common human cognitive condition. General Anthropology, 5, 1–48.

Conley, D. (1999). Being black, living in the red: Race, wealth, and social policy in America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Cose, E. (1998). Color-blind: Seeing beyond race in a race-obsessed world. New York: Harper.

Devlin, B., Fienberg, S. E., Resnick, D. P., & Roeder, K. (1997). Intelligence, genes, and success: Scientists respond to The Bell Curve. New York: Springer Verlag.

Ember, C. R., & Ember, M. (1988). Anthropology (5th ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Eysenck, H. J. (1998). Intelligence: A new look. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.

Flynn, J. R. (1987). Massive IQ gains in 14 nations: What IQ tests really measure. Psychological Bulletin, 101, 171–191.

Flynn, J. R. (1999). Searching for justice: The discovery of IQ gains over time. American Psychologist, 54, 5–20.

Gould, S. J. (1981). The mismeasure of man. New York: Norton.

Gould, S. J. (1996). The mismeasure of man (Rev. ed.). New York: Norton.

Gropper, R. C. (1975). Gypsies in the city: Culture patterns and survival. Princeton, NJ: Darwin Press.

Herrnstein, R. J., & Murray, C. (1994). The bell curve: Intelligence and class structure in American life. New York: The Free Press.

Hirsch, J. (1997a). Some history of heredity-vs-environment, genetic inferiority at Harvard. The (incredible) Bell Curve. Genetica, 99(2–3), 207–224.

Hirsch, J. (Ed.). (1997b). Uses and abuses of genetics in society [Special issue]. Genetica, 99(2–3).

Hirsch, J., McGuire, T. R., & Vetta, A. (1980). Concepts of behavior genetics and misapplications in humans. In J. S. Lockard (Ed.), The evolution of human social behavior (pp. 215–238). New York: Elsevier.

Jencks, C., & Phillips, M. (1998). The black–white test score gap. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.

Jensen, A. R. (1998). The g factor: The science of mental ability. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Johnson, R. P. (1974). Phenotypic variation, fingerprints, and human behavior: An application of the family-pedigree paradigm (Doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois, 1974). Dissertation Abstracts International, 35(1), 546B.

Kaufman, A. S., & Kaufman, N. L. (1983). Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.