Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth

By Jefferson M. Fish | Go to book overview

altogether, recognizing that the categories are all social constructions. Then they could either list the categories they need to collect information about without characterizing them in any way, or settle for a single nonbiological term like ethnicity.


IN CONCLUSION

Clarifying our thinking to separate the etics of physical appearance from the emics of folk taxonomies illuminates the emotionally charged but confused topic of race. Understanding that different cultures have different folk taxonomies suggests that we respond to the question “What race is that person?” not by “black, ” or “white, ” but by “where?” and “when?”


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Thanks to Robert Ghiradella and Dolores Newton for their helpful comments on the chapter as a whole and to Dolores Augustine, Clover Hall, Louise McKenzie, Lina Norona, Denise Belén Santiago, Gunga T. Tavares, Valerie Vulcain, and Muriel Wiltord for their assistance with various parts of the chapter.


REFERENCES

Alland, A. (1971). Human diversity. New York: Columbia University Press.

Belafonte, H. (1956). Brown skin girl. On Calypso [33 rpm record, LPM-1248]. Camden, NJ: Radio Corporation of America.

Berry, J. W. (1969). On cross-cultural comparability. International Journal of Psychology, 4, 119–128.

Brice-Baker, J. (1996). Jamaican families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & J. K. Pearce (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (2nd ed., pp. 85–96). New York: Guilford.

De Andrade, L. L. (1997). The question of race: Cape Verdean Americans talk about their race and identity. Cimboa, 2(4), 23–25.

Degler, C. N. (1971). Neither black nor white: Slavery and race relations in Brazil and the United States. New York: Macmillan.

Fish, J. M. (1995a). Mixed blood. Psychology Today, 28(6), 55–61, 76, 80.

Fish, J. M. (1995b). Why psychologists should learn some anthropology. American Psychologist, 50(1), 44–45.

Fish, J. M. (1996). Culture and therapy: An integrative approach. New York: Aronson.

Fish, J. M. (1997). How psychologists think about “race.” General Anthropology, 4(1), 1–4.

Fish, J. M., & Newton, D. (1998). Review of the book Black, Jewish, and interracial: It's not the color of your skin but the race of your kin, and other myths of identity. American Anthropologist, 100(3), 23–24.

Harris, M. (1964). Patterns of race in the Americas. New York: Walker.

Harris, M. (1970). Referential ambiguity in the calculus of Brazilian racial identity. Southwestern Journal of Anthropology 26(1), 1–14.

Marks, J. (1995). Human biodiversity: Genes, race, and history. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.

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