Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth

By Jefferson M. Fish | Go to book overview

the persistence of the racial worldview in large sectors of American society can and will occur in tandem with a decline in racism in other sectors. The ideological components of race will only disintegrate, if at all, when greater real equality has been achieved, and individuals everywhere, regardless of their biological characteristics, find social race status irrelevant in their daily lives.


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