Race and Intelligence: Separating Science from Myth

By Jefferson M. Fish | Go to book overview

kindergarten. Children are much more dependent on their families for education in the early years than in the school years. In any case, preschool research not only demonstrates that cognitive development is significantly malleable in the early years, but that preschool education can substantially improve later cognitive development for children in low-income families. This leads us to recommend increased public investments in preschool education as a means to decrease educational and economic inequality. We do not mean to suggest that preschool education could by itself eliminate interethnic inequalities or that it is the only policy that should be pursued for this purpose (policies to increase the incomes of poor families with young children are also obvious candidates). We do believe that this is one avenue to increased equality that is greatly underutilized.


REFERENCES

Abelson, W. D. (1974). Head Start graduates in school: Studies in New Haven, Connecticut. In A report on longitudinal evaluations of preschool programs (Vol. I, pp. 1–14). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Abelson, W. D., Zigler, E., & DeBlasi, C. L. (1974). Effects of a four-year follow through program on economically disadvantaged children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 66, 756–771.

Aigner, D. J. (1973). Regression with a binary independent variable subject to errors of observation. Journal of Econometrics, 17, 49–59.

Allington, R. L., & Walmsley, S. A. (1995). No quick fix: Rethinking literacy programs in America's elementary schools. New York: Teachers College Press.

Anastasi, A., & Urbina, S. (1997). Psychological testing (7th ed.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Andrews, S., Blumenthal, J., Johnson, D., Kahn, A., Ferguson, C., Lasater, T., Malone, P., & Wallace, D. (1982). The skills of mothering: A study of parent child development centers. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 46(6), Serial No. 198.

Baker, P., Keck, C., Mott, F., & Quinlan, S. (1993). NLSY child handbook, 1993. Columbus: Ohio State University, Center for Human Resource Research.

Barnett, W. S. (1993). Benefit-cost analysis of preschool education: Findings from a 25-year follow-up. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 63(4), 500–508.

Barnett, W. S. (1998). Long-term effects on cognitive development and school success. In W. S. Barnett & S. S. Boocock (Eds.), Early care and education for children in poverty (pp. 11–44). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Barnett, W. S., & Boyce, G. C. (1995). Effects of a child with Down syndrome on parents' activities. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 100(2), 115–127.

Barnett, W. S., & Camilli, G. (1999). Estimating Head Start effects. Unpublished paper, Rutgers University, Graduate School of Education, New Brunswick, NJ.

Barnett, W. S., Tarr, J., & Frede, E. C. (1999). Early childhood education in the Abbott districts: Children's needs and the need for high quality programs. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University, Center for Early Education at Rutgers.

Barnett, W. S., Young, J. W., & Schweinhart, L. J. (1998). How preschool education contributes to cognitive development and school success: An empirical model. In W. S. Barnett & S. S. Boocock (Eds.), Early care and education for children in poverty (pp. 167–184). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Becker, G. S. (1981). A treatise on the family. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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