Birth Passages: Maternity and Nostalgia, Antiquity to Shakespeare

By Theresa M. Krier | Go to book overview

5

From Aggression to Gratitude:
Air and Song in the Parlement
of Foules

The number of successive saltations the nimble thought can make . . . [t]he habit . . . of not pausing but going on, is a sort of importation or domestication of the Divine effort in a man.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Chaucer among all early poets in English seems to love salience in Emerson's sense: going on, wandering, venturing forth, sallying out, taking leaps, crossing unanticipated thresholds—as in the Parlement of Foules, where his saltations surprisingly lead him to Dame Nature and to song. 1. In her region he engages with forms of cultural nostalgia for the shelter provided by maternal sound, insofar as the mother's singing, crooning, encompassing the child with a volume of air shaped by her voice constitute long-lived and haunting topoi. Psychoanalytic theory makes much of maternal voice. Recent theorists of song, especially of opera and its audiences, find it indispensable. But how can we have the textured richness of interior life borne on that voice, while also paying the debt to the mother, saluting her distinctness and difference from us?

____________________
1.
Emerson's notions of saliency and sallying are articulated in many places in his works; the epigraph comes from “Poetry and Imagination, ” in Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 8 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1903), 8:1-75, at 72.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Birth Passages: Maternity and Nostalgia, Antiquity to Shakespeare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.