The History of Human Marriage - Vol. 1

By Edward Westermarck | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
THE FREQUENCY OF MARRIAGE AND THE MARRIAGE AGE

AMONG the uncivilised races of men marriage not only exists but is much more frequent than among ourselves. As a general rule, nearly every man endeavours to marry when he has reached the age of puberty, and practically every woman gets married. Among some savages priests or magicians have to remain single; and there are inverts, male and female, who avoid sexual intercourse with the opposite sex. With the former I shall deal in the next chapter, of the latter I have spoken in another work.1 I shall now give some instances of what, with variations in details, undoubtedly may be said to be the rule among the vast majority of savage tribes.

Mr. Bridges wrote to me that among the Yahgans of Tierra del Fuego none but mutes and imbeciles remained single, except some lads of vigour who did so from choice, influenced by licentiousness. But "no woman remained unmarried; almost immediately on her husband's death the widow found another husband." So also among the Lengua Indians of the Paraguayan Chaco there is no such thing as a spinster, and even a widow rarely remains single, unless she be old; "their mode of life and state of society are such that every girl must have a recognised protector."2Dr. NordenskiÖld never heard of the existence of any elderly unmarried women among the Choroti or in any other Chaco tribe.3 The Charruas of Paraguay, according to

____________________
1
Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas, vol. ii. ch. xliii., "'Homosexual Love.'"
2
Grubb, An Unknown People in an Unknown Land, p. 214 sq.
3
NordenskiÖld, Indianliv i El Gran Chaco (Syd-Amerika), p. 88. VOL. I

-337-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of Human Marriage - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 571

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.