Breaking the China-Taiwan Impasse

By Donald S. Zagoria; Chris Fugarino | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 12

DPP's China Policy, Content Compiled from the “Resolution Regarding Taiwan's Future, ” May 1999

The Democratic Progressive Party platform, originally adopted by the party's first national Congress in 1986, lists the establishment of a sovereign and independent Republic of Taiwan as the first among several goals of this property. However, recognizing Taiwan's responsibilities as a member of the global community and realities of the international political environment, the DPP has also adopted a realistic interpretation and pragmatic approach to China policy.

As the current ruling party in a maturing democracy, the DPP's priority on cross-Strait relations with China is the safeguarding of the sovereignty and rights of Taiwan's twenty-three million people, acting in the best interests of the island's security, and furthermore, undertaking Taiwan's responsibility in preserving stability in the East Asia-Pacific region.

The issue of Taiwan's relations with China is arguably the most emotionally provocative, controversial, and difficult to solve in Taiwan. Early in 1998, the DPP held a conference to discuss an appropriate China Policy. Through open debate, the differences were understood while a consensus was met. Among the agreed points, the DPP supports comprehensive dialogue and exchanges with China, with the goal of eventually achieving the normalization of cross-Strait relations. As for the issue of sovereignty, since under present international conditions, it is impossible for either side across the Strait to compromise on this matter, the DPP prefers to avoid discussion with China on this sensitive yet contentious topic while dealing with the more practical and functional matters first. Comprehensive dialogue may cover a wide range

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