Women and the Family in Chinese History

By Patricia Buckley Ebrey | Go to book overview

List of illustrations

FIGURES
1.1 Zhu Shouchang finally finding his concubine mother, left behind by his father20
1.2 Exemplary widowed concubine who remains deferential to the wife even though she is the mother of the only son34
2.1 Gou Zhun's concubine singing a song she composed to admonish him41
3.1 Dai Liang succeeds in marrying out five daughters by making the dowries frugal63
3.2 Sample of three documents the bride's family should send to the groom's73
4.1 Genealogy of Liu Kezhuang's immediate family94
5.1 Zhao Jiming's diagram of descent group burial117
5.2 The Chen communal family, whose 700 members ate together, sitting according to age121
5.3 Fan Zhongyan creating a charitable estate to supply his relatives131
6.1 Urns holding cremated remains unearthed from Song-period tombs in Foshan City, Guangdong province150
6.2 Diagram of a tomb dated 1266, with an urn with cremated remains buried in a small pit below an above-ground structure150
7.1 Page from a late Song reference work listing surnames with their associated place names169
8.1 Illustration from the seventeenth-century novel about Sui Yangdi (Sui Yangdi yanshi)179
8.2 Song statues of serving women attending the Jade Emperor, at the Shrine of the Jade Emperor, Jincheng, Shanxi province183
8.3 Illustration from chapter 21 of the novel Jin Ping Mei, showing the protagonist with several of his concubines and their maids191

-vi-

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