Black Demons: The Media's Depiction of the African American Male Criminal Stereotype

By Dennis Rome | Go to book overview

Preface

The main idea for this book was developed, in part, several years ago when Susan Smith, a young white mother of Union, South Carolina, strapped her small children into the backseat of her car and drove the car into a lake. Before she confessed to this act, she told police and representatives of the media that her car had been carjacked by an African American male. She gave the police a description of a young African American male wearing a skull cap: the image of a criminal for most Americans. A small group of my undergraduate students and a few of my faculty colleagues and I would frequently gather informally to discuss current events and issues that pertained especially to the African American community. It was through these impromptu and informal gatherings that Black Demons was born. I would like to thank, from the bottom of my heart, these strikingly brilliant people who comprised these gatherings: Professors Fred McElroy, Gloria Gibson, and Coramae Mann; among my favorite undergraduate students were Pete Adams, Philmore Hutchins, and Christopher Bickel. Special thanks go to Rahsaan Bartet for his selection of icons used for the “conceptual entrapment of media” schema in chapter 3 and for his countless trips to the library to corroborate sources.1 My good friends and mentors David Takeuchi, Carla Howery and Norma Nager deserve special thanks for the unconditional love and support they continue to give me. Special gratitude is due also to Wendy Beck for her reading of earlier versions of this manuscript, and thanks to my friend and colleague Steve Chermak for whom without his encouragement and support this manuscript would not have come to fruition.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Demons: The Media's Depiction of the African American Male Criminal Stereotype
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 134

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.