Bosnia and the New Collective Security

By Elinor C. Sloan | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Peacemaking in Bosnia

When conflict turned to war in Bosnia in early April 1992, there was already a diplomatic peacemaking mechanism in place. The European Community had established a peace conference on Yugoslavia under the chairmanship of Lord Peter Carrington in The Hague in early September 1991 and then suspended the conference in November 1991 after adopting limited economic sanctions against Serbia. In March 1992, the conference reconvened in Lisbon in the form of constitutional talks mediated by Carrington and Portuguese Foreign Minister José Cutileiro. The talks succeeded in finding agreement among the Bosnian Serb, Croat, and Muslim leaders on a plan—known as the Lisbon Agreement—under which Bosnia would become an independent confederation of three ethnic units headed by a common central government. 1 However, this consensus rapidly deteriorated when discussion turned to designating specific areas for the communities.

After Bosnia descended into war, the European Community, for a time, continued its efforts to induce the Bosnian parties to agree on future constitutional arrangements for the republic. It also set about negotiating an end to hostilities, securing two cease-fire agreements in Sarajevo in April 1992. But the agreements were short-lived, and the European Community was forced to withdraw. In early May 1992 Cutileiro informed the parties that because of the deteriorating security situation in Sarajevo he had decided on what proved to be a permanent postponement of the EC peace conference. 2

While the European Community engaged in peacemaking efforts in the spring and summer of 1992, the United Nations concentrated on

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bosnia and the New Collective Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Acronyms xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Range of Choice: Crisis Management Tools for the Post-Cold War Era 1
  • Chapter 2 - Prelude to the Bosnian Crisis 11
  • Chapter 3 - Peacekeeping in Bosnia 19
  • Chapter 4 - Peacemaking in Bosnia 45
  • Chapter 5 - Peace Enforcement in Bosnia 71
  • Chapter 6 - Peacebuilding in Bosnia 83
  • Chapter 7 - Conclusion 99
  • Appendix 1 113
  • Appendix 2 115
  • Selected Bibliography 119
  • Index 125
  • About the Author 129
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 131

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.