The Democratic Potential of Charter Schools

By Stacy Smith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The support of many people is reflected in the pages of this book. I wish to thank the faculty and students at Winthrop Academy Charter School (pseudonym)—this study would not have been possible without their cooperation and assistance. I also want to thank my graduate school advisors—Dr. Kenneth Strike, Dr. Deborah Trumbull, and Dr. Don Barr—for their guidance and critical feedback. I am indebted to my friends and colleagues Alexis Kaminsky, Rob Reich, and Anne Dodd for their careful reading and exchange of ideas. I am grateful for the support of the Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. And, finally, the unflagging encouragement of my husband, Matthew Arrants, provided me with the wherewithal to complete this project.

I have presented some of the arguments of this book previously in other forms. The introduction, chapter 1, and chapter 5 each include expanded and/or adapted versions of segments of “The Democratizing Potential of Charter Schools” which appeared in Educational Leadership 56, no. 2 (1998): 55-58 and “School Choice: Accountability to Publics, Not Markets” which appeared in Journal of Maine Education 25 (1999): 7-10. Portions of chapter 2 are adapted from “Voluntary Segregation: Gender and Race as Legitimate Grounds for Differential Treatment and Freedom of Association,” which appeared in Philosophy of Education 1996, ed. Frank Margonis, 48-57 (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997), “Democracy, Plurality, and Education: Deliberating Practices of and for Civic Participation” which appeared in Philosophy of Education 1997, ed. Susan Laird, 338-347 (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998), and “Charter Schools: Voluntary Associations or Political Communities?” which appeared in Philosophy of Education 1998, ed. Steve Tozer, 131-139 (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999). Each of these selections is used by permission of the publisher.

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