The Democratic Potential of Charter Schools

By Stacy Smith | Go to book overview

Introduction

Since Minnesota first enacted legislation in 1991, charter school reform has swept the country. Within the span of eight years, thirty-six states and the District of Columbia have passed charter legislation, and many other state legislatures are now considering proposed bills. Charter schools are unequivocally public entities—they must provide a free education to all eligible public school students and they are funded by public moneys, often based upon a per pupil expenditure from the state. But charters blur the boundary between “public” and “private” schools in a few different ways. First, they are similar to private schools in that they are schools of choice with distinct missions. Second, charter schools are autonomously managed by groups of parents, teachers, or community members; but unlike private schools, they are under contract with a public agency. Finally, charters are freed from many bureaucratic structures governing public schools at the state and local levels; they make most of their own decisions about budget, personnel, and curriculum.

Because charter schools blur traditional boundaries between public and private schools in a variety of ways, they revive questions of balancing public and private interests in education which we in the United States have struggled with since public education became compulsory early in the twentieth century. In large part because of tensions particular to this public/private struggle, debate about charter schooling has been lively, and often heated and contentious. Many supporters tout charters as the best hope for public education, while equally vocal critics insist that charters will bring about its demise. 1

Although their stances are vastly different, both proponents and opponents of the movement emphasize the privatizing aspects of charter school reform. Proponents draw heavily upon language associated with the marketplace. They refer to students and parents as consumers and clients, play up the attributes of bringing competition into the public educational

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Democratic Potential of Charter Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.