Calhoun and Popular Rule: The Political Theory of the Disquisition and Discourse

By H. Lee Cheek Jr. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was made possible through the assistance of many kind souls. For years Professors Claes G. Ryn, David Walsh, and Steve Schneck have served as my guides and mentors. Professor Ryn assumed a major role in my maturation as a student of political theory and American politics.

My initial interest in American political thought was encouraged by my professors at Western Carolina University—Al Gilman, Gordon Mercer, Bill Latimer, Cliff Lovin, Steve Ealy, and Max Williams. While I was a student at Duke Divinity School, Stanley Hauerwas and Will Willimon were helpful in many ways. The advice of the late Russell Kirk was critical in my decision to pursue a study of Calhoun's political thought. George Carey and Jim McClellan have been more like older siblings than mentors to me during the last decade, and I am forever indebted to them for their support.

In the course of researching and writing this book, I was blessed with the kind assistance of phenomenal friends—Tim Goodman, Tim Sifert, David Hockett, Constantine Gutzman, Clyde Ellis, Clyde Wilson, Larry Toll, Mark Farnsworth, Don Pace, Jerry Ray, Doug Weaver, Harry Bayne, Brad Frazier, and Ruth Ediger.

Clyde Wilson, Constantine Gutzman, Harry Bayne, and Tim Goodman are due special thanks. As the longtime editor of The Papers of John C. Calhoun and the world's leading authority on the Carolinian, Clyde was an inspiration by example. This project would have been impossible without his friendship, tutelage, and encouragement. Conversations with my dear friend Constantine Gutzman were invaluable— and his criticisms aided every aspect of this book. My pal and former colleague Harry Bayne offered much sage advice about the South

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