Mother Imagery in the Novels of Afro-Caribbean Women

By Simone A. James Alexander | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I acknowledge and express deep appreciation to the many wonderful people whose encouragement and support made the writing of this manuscript possible. First, I would like to thank the University of Missouri Press, which welcomed and accepted my proposal for the publication of this book. I especially thank the editor-in-chief, Beverly Jarrett, who was my initial contact, and Jane Lago, who has exhibited tremendous patience in guiding me through the initial stages. I also thank Karen Caplinger, the marketing manager, and Annette Wenda, the copyeditor, for her insight and wonderful suggestions.

My thanks to faculty at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, namely, Abena Busia, Reneé Larrier, Josephine Diamond, and Gerard Aching, who has since joined the faculty at New York University, for their careful reading, patience, guidance, and insight during the early stages of this manuscript. Sincere thanks also to Nancy and Candace of the English Department at Rutgers. I am also very grateful to Maryse Condé for her kindness and openness and for granting me an interview. I am also very appreciative of her continued support.

I thank the Dean of English and Humanities of Pratt Institute, Toni Oliviero, for her generous support and encouragement. I am indebted to Ken Boxley and Tess Magsaysay of the Ken Boxley Scholarship Foundation, who provided me with a fellowship without which this project would not have been possible. I thank the Graduate School at Rutgers University for a Study Abroad Fellowship that enabled me to pursue research in Jamaica at the University of the West Indies, Mona. I extend special thanks to Barbara Sirman and Dean Harvey Waterman. I also thank Elizabeth Wilson of the University of the West Indies, who greatly encouraged me in my endeavors, and Jean Small, who greatly contributed to my pleasant stay in Jamaica.

Sincere thanks to my friends Paula, for her encouragement and support and for playing an important role during the earliest phases of this project, and Shondel, who has offered meaningful suggestions, valuable advice, and support. I would also like to thank my

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