Art in Progress: A Philosophical Response to the End of the Avant-Garde

By Maarten Doorman; Sherry Marx | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
I
ntroduction 1 Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophische Untersuchungen/Philosophical Investigations, ed. G.E.M. Anscombe, R. Rhees, Oxford 1953: 7-22 (21). See also P. Baker and P.M.S. Hacker, Wittgenstein: Understanding and Meaning: An Analytical Commentary on the `Philosophical Investigations', Oxford 1980: 16-18.
2
See, e.g., M. Mandelbaum, History, Man and Reason: A Study in Nineteenth-Century Thought, London/Baltimore 1974: 369-70; Sydney Pollard, The Idea of Progress, London 1968: 145-46; W. Warren Wagar, Good Tidings: The Belief in Progress from Darwin to Mar- cuse, Bloomington/London 1972: 145ff.
3
Gerard Reve, Zelf schrijver worden, Albert Verwey Lectures 1985, Leiden 1986: 78.
4
Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment, trans. John Cum- ming, London 1973: 229-30 (or. Dialektik der Aufklärung, Frankfurt am Main 1947).
5
Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition, trans. Geoffrey Bennington and Brian Massami, Manchester 1984 (or. La condition postmoderne, Paris 1979).
6
Arthur C. Danto, `The End of Art,' in The Philosophical Disenfranchisement of Art, New York, 1986: 81-115; esp. the last essay in the book, `Art, Evolution, and the Conscious- ness of History' (187-210). See also the `Introduction' to his Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-historical Perspective, New York 1992, and the essay therein entitled `Learning to Live with Pluralism,' 3-12, 217-31; `Introduction' and `Art After the End of Art' in Danto, Embodied Meanings: Critical Essays and Aesthetic Meditations, New York 1994: 3-14, 321-33; and a more sophisticated analysis in Danto, After the End of Art: Con- temporary Art and the Pale of History, Princeton 1997: 3-60, 193-217.
7
Danto 1986: 86-101, cf. 198-200. Danto 1997 further qualifies this opinion. Here he virtually equates the second model with the history of modernism, while at the same time not excluding the possibility of progress with respect to the narrative of expres- sion. Moreover, the history of modernism now also becomes a history of increasing reflection on the question of what art is. See Danto 1997: 62-67.
8
Danto 1986: 101-4, 106-7.
9
Danto 1986: 110-15, 204-10; Danto 1992: 4ff. Cf. Danto 1997: 30ff., 42ff., 117-33, 194ff.

1 Perspectives on Progress: A History
1
Quoted in U. Haltern, Die Londoner Weltausstellung von 1851, Munster 1971: 169.
2
Quoted in Haltern 1971: 351.
3
J.B. Bury, The Idea of Progress: An Inquiry into Its Origin and Growth, New York 1955. Other frequently cited historical surveys are: John Baillie, The Belief in Progress, Oxford 1950; Jules Delvaille, Essai sur l'histoire de l'idée de progrès, Paris 1910; Morris Ginsberg, The Idea of Progress: A Revaluation, London 1953; Robert Nisbet, History of the Idea of Progress, New York 1980; Sydney Pollard, The Idea of Progress, London 1968; Joachim Ritter, `Fortschritt,' in Ibid. (ed.), Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, vol. 2, Basel/ Stuttgart 1972: 1032-59; R.V. Sampson, Progress in the Age of Reason: The Seventeenth Century to the Present Day, London 1956.

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Art in Progress: A Philosophical Response to the End of the Avant-Garde
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Art in Progress - A Philosophical Response to the End of the Avant-Garde *
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Introduction 9
  • 1 - Perspectives on Progress: a History 15
  • 2 - From the Ancients and the Moderns: a Door to the Future 29
  • 3 - From Romanticism to the Avant-Garde 45
  • 4 - On Making Revolution 61
  • 5 - Innovation in Painting and Architecture: De Stijl 81
  • 6 - The End of Art 115
  • 7 - A New Approach to an Old Concept 131
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index of Names 177
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