Conceptual Structure and Social Change: The Ideological Architecture of Democratization

By Sara Schatz; Javier Jesús Gutiérrez-Rexach | Go to book overview

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Categorization and Social Agents: The Case of Democratization

THE MONOTONICITY PRINCIPLE: FOUR ISSUES IN THE ANALYSIS OF IDEOLOGY

One of the most intriguing problems of contemporary social science is how to articulate or integrate concepts and properties that are individually generated in theories that deal with social interaction. When human beings participate in social interaction, this process gives rise to structures tied by varying forms of social cohesion; such structures, in turn, lead to new bodies of social action and interaction. There are two immediate and relevant questions for research that emerge from this complex dialectics between process and structure: What is the role of individuals or agent-centered processes in this new emerging body? Do they disappear or become an intrinsic part of the mechanisms of this social entity? These two questions have far-reaching consequences since they should condition the nature of the explanation that social scientists give to social entities. If these entities are assumed to be completely independent of the individuals that form them, then there is no reason to integrate in our explanation the processes and cognitive articulation of the individual constituents of the larger social bodies. On the other hand, if that dependency exists, one might legitimately wonder to what extent the functioning of this more complex social structure inherits some if not all of the constituent factors of the individual agents.

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Conceptual Structure and Social Change: The Ideological Architecture of Democratization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 - Categorization and Social Agents: the Case of Democratization 1
  • 2 - A Cognitive Model of Concepts and Ideology 35
  • Note 86
  • 3 - Ideological Systems, Dynamics, and Constraints 87
  • Notes 112
  • 4 - Mass Attitudes in the Transition to Electoral Democracy 113
  • 5 - Governing Elites, Counterelites, and the Struggle to Shape Mass Opinion 157
  • Conclusions 193
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 217
  • About the Authors 221
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