A Question of Self-Esteem: The United States and the Cold War Choices in France and Italy, 1944-1958

By Alessandro Brogi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project has benefited greatly from the generous assistance of various institutions. An entire year of my research and writing was sponsored by an Award Fellowship from the John C. Baker Peace Studies Program at Ohio University. I also received support from the Contemporary History Institute and the John Houk Memorial Travel Grant at Ohio University for my archival research in Rome, Paris, and at various locations in the United States. International Security Studies at Yale University provided funding for the final revisions of my manuscript. Additional support for my research travels came from the Dipartimento di Studi sullo Stato of the University of Florence, Italy, the Centro di Studi Americani in Rome, and the Universita Cattolica of Milan. To all these institutions that sustained my transatlantic endeavor, I am deeply grateful.

Some archivists stand out for their remarkable skills and courteousness: Madame Chantal Tourtier de Bonazzi of the National Archives in Paris, Carlo Fiorentino of the State Archives in Rome, and, above all, David Haight of the Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas.

At Yale, International Security Studies provided not only funding but also the congenial setting for the completion of my manuscript. I was lucky to receive attention and constant intellectual stimulation from Professor Paul Kennedy. Associate director Ted Bromund has always been remarkably available for discussion and exchange of scholarly information, and Ann Carter-Drier, as everybody knows at ISS, is the indispensable head of staff, always on top of things.

-xiii-

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A Question of Self-Esteem: The United States and the Cold War Choices in France and Italy, 1944-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Invitation and Pride 13
  • 2 - The Old Game 47
  • 3 - Mastering Interdependence? Status, the “third Force, ” and the Western Alliance 75
  • 4 - Mastering Interdependence? Status, Nationalism, and the European Army Plan 117
  • 5 - Mediterranean “missions” 171
  • 6 - A Question of Leadership 223
  • Conclusions 259
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 305
  • About the Author 317
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