A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

Crack in the World (1965)

Rating: ** Threat: Fissure in the earth's crust

Paramount. Written by Jon Manchip White & Julian Halevy; Photographed by Manuel Berenguer; Special effects by Alex Weldon & Eugene Lourie; Edited by Derek Parsons; Music by John Douglas; Produced by Bernard Glasser & Lester A. Sansom; Directed by Andrew Marton. 96 minutes


ANNOTATED CAST LIST

Dana Andrews (Dr. Stephen Sorenson, director of Project Inner Space); Janette Scott (Maggie, Sorenson's wife); Kieron Moore (Dr. Ted Rampion, project geologist & Maggie's former boyfriend); Alexander Knox (Sir Charles Eggerston, head of United Nations scientific commission); Peter Damon (John Masefield, second-in-command of Project Inner Space); Jim Gillen (Rand, commission member); Gary Lasdun (Markov, project statistician); Mike Steen (Steel, Rampion's assistant); Emilio Carrere (Bill Evans, Sorenson's physician); Sydna Scott (Angela, Sorenson's secretary); John Karlson (Dr. Reynolds, eccentric project scientist); Alfred Brown (Dr. Gupta, project scientist); Todd Martin (Simpson, engineer at volcano); Ben Tatar (Indian commissioner).


SYNOPSIS

Crack in the World is rooted in a brilliant and imaginative concept, but the script was never properly developed, so the resulting motion picture is undermined by clumsy plot loopholes. Nevertheless, the film crowds enough quickpaced action and dazzle to be entertaining, at least for the juvenile audience, for which it was primarily intended.

The story opens as a jeep convoy winds its way down a road in a remote area of Tanganyika, traveling to the headquarters of Project Inner Space. This facility is attempting to drill through the earth's crust to access the magma, which would give the world a limitless source of thermal energy and an abundance of new minerals. Central operations is located in the deepest natural shaft in the world, two miles down. The United Nations (UN) scientific commission is coming to hear a progress report by Dr. Stephen Sorenson, head of the project. The drilling has been stymied by an impenetrable mantle deep in the earth. Sorenson has a plan to penetrate the mantle with a ten-megaton nuclear device, and he needs their approval. Sir Charles Eggerston, the commission's leading member, questions Sorenson about the risk. The doctor mentions that his staff geologist, Dr. Ted Rampion, fears that underground nuclear tests have weakened the earth's crust and that there is danger of a fissure that would cause a major calamity. The other staff scientists feel the risk is minimal.

Dr. Sorenson is suffering from a strange skin disease, which his physician,

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Overview: Cinematic Visions of the Apocalypse xi
  • A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema: Fifty Films in Depth 1
  • The 27th Day (1957) 3
  • Armageddon (1998) 10
  • Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) 17
  • Crack in the World (1965) 22
  • The Dawn of the Dead (1978) 27
  • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) 33
  • The Day the Sky Exploded (1958/61) 40
  • Day the World Ended (1956) 44
  • Deep Impact (1998) 48
  • Deluge (1933) 54
  • Doomsday Machine (1967/72) 59
  • Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) 63
  • The End of the World (1930/34) 70
  • Five (1951) 74
  • Holocaust 2000 (1978) 78
  • The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945) 83
  • Kronos (1957) 88
  • The Last Man on Earth (1964) 93
  • The Last War (1961) 98
  • The Last Wave (1977) 103
  • The Last Woman on Earth (1960) 108
  • Lifeforce (1985) 112
  • The Lost Missile (1958) 117
  • The Magnetic Monster (1953) 122
  • The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) 127
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) 133
  • Meteor (1979) 139
  • Moonraker (1979) 145
  • The Night the World Exploded (1957) 152
  • Noah's Ark (1929) 157
  • No Blade of Grass (1970) 162
  • No Survivors Please (1964) 168
  • One Night Stand (1984) 172
  • On the Beach (1959) 177
  • Quiet Earth (1985) 184
  • Robot Monster (1953) 189
  • Runestone (1991) 194
  • The Satan Bug (1965) 199
  • The Seventh Sign (1988) 205
  • Solar Crisis (1990) 210
  • Star Trek—the Motion Picture (1978) 214
  • Target Earth (1953) 221
  • Them! (1954) 226
  • Virus (1980) 231
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) 238
  • The War of the Worlds (1953) 243
  • When Worlds Collide (1951) 249
  • Where Have All the People Gone? (1974) 255
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) 259
  • Zarkorr the Invader (1996) 265
  • Appendices 269
  • Appendix A 271
  • Appendix B 279
  • Appendix C 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 315

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.