A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

Runestone (1991)

Rating: ** Threat: Ragnarök

Hyperion. Written by Willard Carroll based on a novella by Mark E. Rogers; Photographed by Mischa Suslov; Special effects by Max W. Anderson & John Eggett; Edited by Lynne Southerland; Music by David Newman; Produced by Harold E. Gould Jr. & Thomas Wilhoute; Directed by Willard Carroll. 105 minutes.


ANNOTATED CAST LIST

Peter Riegert (Capt. Gregory Fanducci, New York City homicide detective); Joan Severance (Marla Stewart, an artist); Tim Ryan (Dr. Sam Stewart, her husband and an archaeologist); Mitchell Laurence (Martin Almquist, museum director possessed by Fenrir); Dawan Scott (Fenrir, wolf creature from Norse mythology); Alexander Godunov (Sigvaldson the clockmaker, actually Tyr, a Norse god); William Hickey (Lars Hagström, eccentric scholar of mythology); Donald Hotton (Ask Franaq, Norse scholar); Chris Young (Jacob, his grandson); Lawrence Tierney (Richardson, New York City police chief); Erika Schickel (Angela, Martin's assistant); Bill Kalmenson (Lester, art critic); Arthur Malet (Stoddard, medieval art expert and curator); John Hobson (Marotta, museum guard); Anthony Cistaro (detective); Merilyn Carney (Tawny, museum patron); Greg Wrangler (Bob, museum patron); Ed Corbett (janitor); William Utay (Truck driver who delivers the runestone); Sam Menning (wino killed by Fenrir); Gil Perez (Alberto, mugger killed by Fenrir); Gary Lahti (Sanders); Ralph Monaco (cabbie); Peter Bigler (Harris, policeman); Richard Moliware (Pulaski, policeman); Rick Marzan (Strange, policeman); Kim Delgado (Reynolds, policeman); Joshua Cox (Crossley, policeman); Vanessa Easton (nurse who tends Stewart); Carl Parker (elevator operator); Matthew Boyett (Tyr's apprentice); David Newman (Graves); Josef Rainer, Christopher Holder, Susan Lentini, Kelly Miller (Magnussen board members and their wives); Carol Hickey, Lisa Dinkins (bespectacled guests at fundraiser); Eben Ham, Layne Beamer (policemen summoned to the museum).


SYNOPSIS

A basic knowledge of Norse mythology helps to raise this artful, but confusing, horror film from the level of an offbeat werewolf film to a modern-day setting of Ragnarök, the Norse doomsday. A brief mythological primer is helpful to decifer the plot. Odin, the foremost of the gods, is alarmed when his sometime adversary, Loki the trickster, sires three monstrous offspring. The worst is Fenrir, a monstrous wolf who grows more dangerous each day. Only one god, Tyr, is brave enough to confront Fenrir, and he imprisons him with magic, los-

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A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Overview: Cinematic Visions of the Apocalypse xi
  • A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema: Fifty Films in Depth 1
  • The 27th Day (1957) 3
  • Armageddon (1998) 10
  • Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) 17
  • Crack in the World (1965) 22
  • The Dawn of the Dead (1978) 27
  • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) 33
  • The Day the Sky Exploded (1958/61) 40
  • Day the World Ended (1956) 44
  • Deep Impact (1998) 48
  • Deluge (1933) 54
  • Doomsday Machine (1967/72) 59
  • Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) 63
  • The End of the World (1930/34) 70
  • Five (1951) 74
  • Holocaust 2000 (1978) 78
  • The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945) 83
  • Kronos (1957) 88
  • The Last Man on Earth (1964) 93
  • The Last War (1961) 98
  • The Last Wave (1977) 103
  • The Last Woman on Earth (1960) 108
  • Lifeforce (1985) 112
  • The Lost Missile (1958) 117
  • The Magnetic Monster (1953) 122
  • The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) 127
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) 133
  • Meteor (1979) 139
  • Moonraker (1979) 145
  • The Night the World Exploded (1957) 152
  • Noah's Ark (1929) 157
  • No Blade of Grass (1970) 162
  • No Survivors Please (1964) 168
  • One Night Stand (1984) 172
  • On the Beach (1959) 177
  • Quiet Earth (1985) 184
  • Robot Monster (1953) 189
  • Runestone (1991) 194
  • The Satan Bug (1965) 199
  • The Seventh Sign (1988) 205
  • Solar Crisis (1990) 210
  • Star Trek—the Motion Picture (1978) 214
  • Target Earth (1953) 221
  • Them! (1954) 226
  • Virus (1980) 231
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) 238
  • The War of the Worlds (1953) 243
  • When Worlds Collide (1951) 249
  • Where Have All the People Gone? (1974) 255
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) 259
  • Zarkorr the Invader (1996) 265
  • Appendices 269
  • Appendix A 271
  • Appendix B 279
  • Appendix C 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 311
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