A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

Zarkorr the Invader (1996)

Rating: * Threat: Alien weapon

Monster Island Entertainment Written by Benjamin Carr; Photographed by Joe C. Maxwell; Special effects by Michael S. Deak; Edited by Felix Chamberlain; Music by Richard Band; Produced by Albert Band (executive), Robert Talbot, Sally Clarke & Karl Edward Hansen; Directed by Aaron Osborne. 80 minutes.


ANNOTATED CAST LIST

Rhys Christian Pugh (Tommy Ward, postal worker and Earth's most average man); Tone Lynch (alien messenger); De'Prise Grossman (Dr. Stephanie Martin, zoologist from the University of Trenton); Charles Schneider (Arthur, wacky computer expert); Mark Hamilton (George Ray, policeman who helps Tommy); Ron Barnes (Larry Bates, George's partner); Stan Chambers (Stan Chambers, TV anchorman); Elizabeth Anderson (Elizabeth Anderson, TV anchorwoman); Robert Craighead (Marty Karlson, reporter killed by Zarkorr); Eileen Wesson (Debbie Dalverson, Newark TV reporter); William Knight (Rocker, Williston sheriff); Dave Richards (Welles, geologist in Williston).


SYNOPSIS

Albert Band is an Italian-born film entrepreneur and producer who specialized in low-budget productions largely geared to the adolescent video market He often worked with his sons, Charles Band and composer Richard Band. Some of their film projects, such as Re-animator (1985), were brilliant and creative. Most, however, were dreadful endeavors noted only for occasional flashes of wacky charm. Zarkorr the Invader is a typical product, unwatchable at times, but with a few moments of genuine wit.

The picture opens in Mount Aurora, California, where a monster appears, bursting forth out of the mountain. The creature is over 180 feet tall and appears reptilian, with huge horns on its head like a bull. It launches a rampage of destruction. Meanwhile, Tommy Ward, a postal worker in Newark, New Jersey, is relaxing at his apartment when a six-inch pixie attracts his attention. She claims to be a mental image projected into his brain by an alien galactic confederation. When Tommy asks why she looks like “a teenage mall tramp, ” she replies her appearance was chosen to be familiar and non-threatening. She claims that he was chosen, as the most average man on Earth, to save his planet from Zarkorr, an alien weapon sent to destroy our planet She tells him that no earthly weapon can stop Zarkorr, but the creature himself contains the key to his own destruction. Zarkorr is programmed to seek out and kill Tommy, so he cannot avoid his task. Her final suggestion is for him to act quickly. Tommy turns on his television and discovers that the attack by Zarkorr has begun. Dr. Stephanie

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A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Overview: Cinematic Visions of the Apocalypse xi
  • A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema: Fifty Films in Depth 1
  • The 27th Day (1957) 3
  • Armageddon (1998) 10
  • Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) 17
  • Crack in the World (1965) 22
  • The Dawn of the Dead (1978) 27
  • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) 33
  • The Day the Sky Exploded (1958/61) 40
  • Day the World Ended (1956) 44
  • Deep Impact (1998) 48
  • Deluge (1933) 54
  • Doomsday Machine (1967/72) 59
  • Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) 63
  • The End of the World (1930/34) 70
  • Five (1951) 74
  • Holocaust 2000 (1978) 78
  • The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945) 83
  • Kronos (1957) 88
  • The Last Man on Earth (1964) 93
  • The Last War (1961) 98
  • The Last Wave (1977) 103
  • The Last Woman on Earth (1960) 108
  • Lifeforce (1985) 112
  • The Lost Missile (1958) 117
  • The Magnetic Monster (1953) 122
  • The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) 127
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) 133
  • Meteor (1979) 139
  • Moonraker (1979) 145
  • The Night the World Exploded (1957) 152
  • Noah's Ark (1929) 157
  • No Blade of Grass (1970) 162
  • No Survivors Please (1964) 168
  • One Night Stand (1984) 172
  • On the Beach (1959) 177
  • Quiet Earth (1985) 184
  • Robot Monster (1953) 189
  • Runestone (1991) 194
  • The Satan Bug (1965) 199
  • The Seventh Sign (1988) 205
  • Solar Crisis (1990) 210
  • Star Trek—the Motion Picture (1978) 214
  • Target Earth (1953) 221
  • Them! (1954) 226
  • Virus (1980) 231
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) 238
  • The War of the Worlds (1953) 243
  • When Worlds Collide (1951) 249
  • Where Have All the People Gone? (1974) 255
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) 259
  • Zarkorr the Invader (1996) 265
  • Appendices 269
  • Appendix A 271
  • Appendix B 279
  • Appendix C 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 311
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