A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

Appendix B

Sampling of Post-Apocalyptic Cinema
A number of films studied in this book combine elements of both the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic genres. The following listing of fifty films represents works that are primarily post-apocalyptic in nature, and will be useful in categorizing some of the thematic and stylistic differences between these two similar classifications. The range of post-apocalyptic films is generally far narrower than the apocalyptic, and many of these pictures take the Mad Max films as their model. This type of film was particularly popular during the 1980s, and a case could be made that to some degree they adopted the characteristics of the American Western. They usually took place in a desert setting and involved a confrontation between forces of good and evil. There are also a number of quality pre-1980s titles, such as the remarkable Soylent Green (1973), in which Edward G. Robinson, dying in real life, had a mesmerizing death scene in a futuristic euthanasia facility, and The Time Machine (1960), one of the all-time finest science fiction efforts. No ratings are provided for these films, but dates and the leading cast members or directors (designated by a small “d” in parenthesis) are included.
1990: The Bronx Warriors (1982) Vic Morrow, Christopher Connelly
2020 Texas Gladiators (1982) Al Cliver
After the Fall of New York (1984) Michael Sopkiw, Edmund Purdom
Aftermath (1985) Forrest J. Ackerman, Sid Haig, Steve Barkett (d)
America 3000 (1986) Chuck Wagner, Carmilla Sparv
Blood of Heroes (1989) Rutger Hauer, Joan Chen
A Boy and His Dog (1973) Don Johnson, Jason Robards
Captive Women (1952) Robert Clarke, William Schallert, Margaret Field
Damnation Alley (1977) Jan-Michael Vincent, George Peppard

-279-

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A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Overview: Cinematic Visions of the Apocalypse xi
  • A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema: Fifty Films in Depth 1
  • The 27th Day (1957) 3
  • Armageddon (1998) 10
  • Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) 17
  • Crack in the World (1965) 22
  • The Dawn of the Dead (1978) 27
  • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) 33
  • The Day the Sky Exploded (1958/61) 40
  • Day the World Ended (1956) 44
  • Deep Impact (1998) 48
  • Deluge (1933) 54
  • Doomsday Machine (1967/72) 59
  • Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) 63
  • The End of the World (1930/34) 70
  • Five (1951) 74
  • Holocaust 2000 (1978) 78
  • The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945) 83
  • Kronos (1957) 88
  • The Last Man on Earth (1964) 93
  • The Last War (1961) 98
  • The Last Wave (1977) 103
  • The Last Woman on Earth (1960) 108
  • Lifeforce (1985) 112
  • The Lost Missile (1958) 117
  • The Magnetic Monster (1953) 122
  • The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) 127
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) 133
  • Meteor (1979) 139
  • Moonraker (1979) 145
  • The Night the World Exploded (1957) 152
  • Noah's Ark (1929) 157
  • No Blade of Grass (1970) 162
  • No Survivors Please (1964) 168
  • One Night Stand (1984) 172
  • On the Beach (1959) 177
  • Quiet Earth (1985) 184
  • Robot Monster (1953) 189
  • Runestone (1991) 194
  • The Satan Bug (1965) 199
  • The Seventh Sign (1988) 205
  • Solar Crisis (1990) 210
  • Star Trek—the Motion Picture (1978) 214
  • Target Earth (1953) 221
  • Them! (1954) 226
  • Virus (1980) 231
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) 238
  • The War of the Worlds (1953) 243
  • When Worlds Collide (1951) 249
  • Where Have All the People Gone? (1974) 255
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) 259
  • Zarkorr the Invader (1996) 265
  • Appendices 269
  • Appendix A 271
  • Appendix B 279
  • Appendix C 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 311
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