Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

rhetoric and, as a result, gained sufficient momentum to be noted by Elizabeth Cady Stanton as “the greatest revolution the world has ever known.”


References and Suggested Readings
Fuller, Sarah Margaret. “Woman in the Nineteenth Century.” The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 1714-35.
Grimke, Sarah Moore. “Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman.” The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 2024-31.
Mill, John Stuart, and Harriet Taylor. “From the Subjection of Women.” Feminist Theory: A Reader. Ed. Wendy Kolmar and Frances Bartkowski. London: Mayfield, 2000. 67-75.
Truth, Sojourner. “Address to the First Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association.” The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 2051-52.
Wellman, Judith. “Elizabeth Cady Stanton.” The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 2031-33.

Lisa R. Williams

ALLENDE, ISABEL

Isabel Allende was born in 1942 in Lima, Peru, the daughter of a Chilean diplomat. By 1945, her parents had ended their marriage, and Isabel returned to Chile with her mother and siblings to live for a time with her maternal grandparents who become the models for Esteban and Clara Trueba in her first novel, The House of the Spirits (1982). She spent her formative years in Bolivia, Europe, and the Middle East with her mother and diplomat stepfather. Allende began her professional career as a TV journalist and a writer for a feminist magazine, but that career and life were interrupted by the overthrow of the Socialist government run by her uncle Salvador Allende in 1973. Soon after the takeover in Chile, she fled to Venezuela with her family. Allende now lives in California. In addition to her best-known work The House of the Spirits (1982), Allende has also written Of Love and Shadows (1984), Eva Luna (1985), The Stories of Eva Luna (1989), The Infinite Plan (1991), Paula (1994), Aphrodite (1997), Daughter of Fortune (1999), Portrait in Sepia (2001), a young adult novel, City of the Beasts (2002), and My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile (2003).

Her first novel, The House of the Spirits, is the story of three generations of women and the man around whose life they revolve. Critics were quick to recognize the similarities of the novel to Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude and its multigenerational Buendía family. The House of the Spirits does begin as a tale of magical realism but shifts, as Robert Antoni notes, “from family saga (fantasy), to love story, to political history” (22) as the novel chronicles first Clara's story, then Blanca's, and finally Alba's.

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Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
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