Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

References and Suggested Readings
Arnow, Harriette. The Dollmaker. 1954. New York: Avon, 1972.
Blain, Virginia, Isobel Grundy, and Patricia Clements. “Arnow, Harriette.” The Feminist Companion to Literature in English. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990. 31.
Eckley, Wilton. Harriette Arnow. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1974.
———. “Arnow, Harriette Simpson.” American National Biography. Ed. John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes. Vol. 1. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Hobbs, Glenda. “Harriette Louisa Simpson Arnow.” American Women Writers: From Colonial Times to the Present. Ed. Lina Mainiero. Vol. 1. New York: Frederick Ungar, 1979.
Lee, Dorothy H. “Harriette Arnow's The Dollmaker: A Journey to Awareness.” Critique: Studies in Modern Fiction 20.2 (1978): 92-98.
Oates, Joyce Carol. “Joyce Carol Oates on Harriette Arnow's The Dollmaker.” Afterword. The Dollmaker. By Harriette Arnow. New York: Avon, 1972. 601-8.

ATWOOD, MARGARET

Margaret Atwood was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, in 1939. She earned a BA degree from the University of Toronto, and an AM degree from Radcliffe College in 1962. Atwood is a prolific poet, novelist, and short-story writer whose work is imbued with a social conscience. Stocks notes, “Since 1978's Two-Headed Poems, Atwood's poetry has increasingly addressed political issues on a national and international level.” He also notes that her “involvement with Amnesty International has produced a searing sequence of poems.”

Atwood's long list of works includes the following novels: The Edible Woman (1969), Surfacing (1972), Lady Oracle (1976), Life Before Man (1979), Bodily Harm (1981), The Handmaid's Tale (1985), Cat's Eye (1988), The Robber Bride (1993), Alias Grace (1996), and The Blind Assassin (2000).

Her volumes of poetry include The Circle Game (1964) The Animals in That Country (1969), The Journals of Susanna Moodie (1970), Procedures for Underground (1970), Power Politics (1971), You Are Happy (1974), Selected Poems (1976), Two-Headed Poems (1978), True Stories (1981), Interlunar (1984), Selected Poems II: Poems Selected and New, 1976-1986 (1986), Selected Poems 1966-1984 (1990), Margaret Atwood Poems 1965-1975 (1991), Morning in the Burned House (1995), and Eating Fire: Selected Poems, 1965-1995 (1998). Atwood also publishes criticism and children's books.

Atwood began writing at an early age, starting a novel about an ant when she was only seven. Though she didn't finish the book, she recalls “it started off quite well.” That Atwood cast her central character as an ant perhaps owes something to growing up in the Canadian bush where her father worked as an entomologist. Whatever the case, Atwood's early experimentation in writing reveals the first fruits of a talent grown ripe with age and experience. She is a writer struck by language and its function as a shaper and reflector of society. Of the role of language in the creative process, Atwood says,

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Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
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