Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

References and Suggested Readings
Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Fawcett Crest, 1985.
———. Inteview with Eleanor Wachtel. “Margaret Atwood.” Writers and Company: In Conversation with Eleanor Wachtel. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1993. 190-203.
Stocks, Anthony G. “Atwood, Margaret (Eleanor).” Contemporary Poets. Ed. Tracy Chevalier. 5th ed. Chicago: St. James Press, 1991.

AUSTEN, JANE

With one of the most recognized and respected names in English literature, with six volumes still in print after nearly two hundred years, and not having to be recovered into the modern literary canon, Jane Austen presents an anomaly in the field of feminist literature. She was born in 1775, as the seventh of eight children, to the Reverend George and Cassandra Leigh Austen and lived a quiet life with her family. The Austen family enjoyed reading novels in a time when many scorned the genre as frivolous at best or immoral at worst. Jane's writing provided much entertainment in her family circle as her novels were passed around and read aloud within the group. Her brother Henry reports, “She read aloud with very great taste and effect. Her own works, probably, were never heard to so much advantage as from her own mouth; for she partook largely in all the best gifts of the comic muse” (259).

By chronology of production, Austen's six novels fall into two natural groupings: As Brian Southam notes, “Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Northanger Abbey were begun in the 1790's and were rewritten and revised before their eventual publication; whereas the three later novels—Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion—belong entirely to Jane Austen's years of maturity.” The novels reveal a growing perfection of style and restraint, and had not Austen died at the early age of forty-one, doubtless her craft would have only continued to sharpen. What she has left us nonetheless is a body of work that reaches a level of perfection etched, as she says, on “the little bit (two Inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

When her niece Anna writes to Jane Austen requesting suggestions for success in writing, Austen recommends that “3 or 4 Families in a Country Village is the very thing to work on.” In another letter to her novel-writing nephew, Edward, Austen comments on the loss of two-and-a-half chapters of his work. She jokingly assures him that she has not “purloined” his work. She says, “What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited Sketches, full of Variety & Glow?” While perhaps she understates the vigor of her own writing, she likewise acknowledges that she has circumscribed a very small world in which she works.

Named in its early drafts First Impressions, Pride and Prejudice is a much revised work allowed to steep long in Austen's possession before this, her “own darling Child” was published in 1813. Perhaps Austen's most widely read and taught novel, it is greatly admired for its balance and symmetry. The novel opens with one of the most famous of all opening lines, “It is a truth universally acknowl-

-24-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.