Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

References and Suggested Readings
Lim, Shirley Geok-Lin. “The Ambivalent American: Asian American Literature on the Cusp.” Reading the Literatures of Asian America. Ed. Shirley Geok-Lin Lim and Amy Ling. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992. 13-32.
———. Among the White Moon Faces: An Asian-American Memoir of Homelands. New York: The Feminist Press, 1996.
———. Contemporary Authors. Ed. Donna Olendorf. Vol. 140. Detroit: Gale Research, 1993.

LISPECTOR, CLARICE

Today viewed as an important novelist in Brazil, Clarice Lispector received little popular attention early in her career and was brought to international attention by the feminist theorist Hélène Cixous. Though there are some discrepancies concerning her birth year, 1925 is generally accepted as the year of Lispector's birth in Ukraine. Her Jewish parents immigrated to Brazil shortly after her birth, and

Lispector was educated in and wrote in Portuguese. Lispector earned a degree in law, married another law student, and had two sons. After the dissolution of her marriage, Lispector lived in Rio de Janeiro until her death from cancer in 1977. Lispector's first novel, Near to the Wild Heart (1944), was written when she was only nineteen, but it has retained an important place in her body of work and in the general modernist canon. She takes her title from a line in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and certainly her style shares many modernist conventions, such as stream of consciousness, internalized intellectualism, and narrative discontinuity. Lispector's main character, Joana, is a lonely and precocious child abandoned by her mother and largely ignored by her father. The first chapter ends with the question, “What's to become of Joana?” and establishes the narrative angst of the novel (15).

Part I of the novel opens with Joana's childhood experiences and moves to her marriage. As a child, Joana is aware of her own creativity, a “restrained force, ready to explode into violence, ” and she feels compelled to repress its power (16). An ongoing dialogue with herself centers on this urge to release the “animal” within (16) and the need to restrain it. The young Joana is hurt by her father's playfulness when he tells one of his friends, “She has told me that when she grows up she's going to be a hero” (24). Insofar as the novel has autobiographical roots, Joana's prophecy is not far from wrong.

After the early death of her father, Joana goes to live with her aunt and uncle in an environment without stimulation or understanding. The preternaturally sensitive Joana, who recognizes “the tranquility that came from the eyes of an ox, the tranquility that came from that sprawling expanse of sea, from the sea's deep womb, from the cat lying rigid on the pavement” (42), meets no sympathetic vibrations in her aunt's home. When she steals a book, Joana's aunt and uncle are all too eager to send her to boarding school so that the “strict discipline” “might help to tame her” (46).

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.