Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

References and Suggested Readings
Evans, Mari, ed. Black Women Writers (1950-1980): A Critical Evaluation. Garden City, NY: Anchor, 1984.
Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., and K.A. Appiah, eds. Alice Walker: Critical Perspectives Past and Present. New York: Amistad, 1993.
Gilbert, Sandra M., and Susan Gubar, eds. The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1996.
Walker, Alice. The Color Purple. New York: Washington Square, 1982.
———. In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose. New York: Harcourt, 1983.

See also Hurston, Zora Neale; Morrison, Toni; Woolf, Virginia.

WALKER, MARGARET

Margaret Walker was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1915. She completed her undergraduate work at Northwestern University at only age nineteen and later studied creative writing at the University of Iowa where she received her MA degree in 1942. Her first volume of poetry, For My People, won her the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award. She completed her PhD degree at University of Iowa in 1965.

She married and had four children with Firnist James Alexander. Walker has taught at colleges and universities throughout the South, but held a long-term appointment at Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi, from 1946 until 1979. Throughout and following her teaching career, Walker has continued to write in several genres. Her body of work includes Richard Wright: Daemonic Genius (1988), This Is My Century: New and Collected Poems (1989), How I Wrote Jubilee and Other Essays (1990), as well as her important novel Jubilee (1966).

Given the obstacles she faced, it is a wonder that Walker wrote at all. Her essays tell of the difficulties she had in finding time to write, juggling her family, home, and career. The prejudices she faced as a woman, as a black woman, and as a Southerner are staggering. Though she labored for decades in higher education, her external successes exacerbated her tenuous relationships with administrators and colleagues.

Walker says she had three aims in writing Jubilee: “(1) to hew to the line of my simple folk story during the war, (2) to maintain historical accuracy and to relate the importance of the war to my characters, plus (3) to point up the significance of the Negro people and their role during the war.”

Margaret Walker's Jubilee is a sweeping historical novel based on the oral history of her own family and prodigious amounts of research. The novel centers on the character Vyry, the unacknowledged child of the plantation master, John Dutton. Vyry is patterned after Walker's own great-grandmother. From her earliest days on the plantation in Dawson, Georgia, to the ending of the book when she is a woman who has lived through “birth and death, flood and fire, sickness and trouble” (408-9), Vyry triumphs in body and spirit over seemingly insurmountable circumstances.

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Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
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