Homegrown Music: Discovering Bluegrass

By Stephanie P. Ledgin | Go to book overview

Where to from Here: Suggested Resources

The following recommendations will assist in your further exploration of bluegrass. Each offers either an immediate source or the road to others that are more detailed or specific to a particular interest. Many are supplementary to another, for example, those that deal with the music's origins and fringes.

Consider these the basis for an ongoing process of discovery. An Internet or library search will readily provide a stunning selection for further study. In addition to comprehensive histories and general overviews of bluegrass and its origins, there are numerous print and video biographies about key personalities. Rare footage continues to be restored of early twentieth-century progenitors of the music as technology opens doors to a look back at the past. While video documentaries exist about some of bluegrass music's major figures, younger artists are finding new outlets for up-to-date personal information. For example, some are producing performance DVDs that contain extended tracks with such features as interviews, photographs, or behind-the-scenes clips. Most living artists, or their record labels, maintain Internet sites with in-depth histories, discographies, and tour dates.

In choosing resources, keep in mind what it is you are looking to learn or from what perspective. Some items present an academic treatment, while others take a layman's approach.

Unlike thirty years ago, when competition was just kicking in within the business of bluegrass, there exists today a plethora of materials and means for discovering bluegrass. Continue your journey with these many print, audio, visual, and electronic resources, and you will never be at a loss for expanding your bluegrass horizons.

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